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This page contains the details for the various OD&D classes presented in Dragon magazine, as well as an OD&D conversion for lupins and rakastas of the material in Dragon #237 and #247. The tortle class is based on the material in the Savage Coast campaign book. Also included are XP tables for the female lesser wereseal and the greater wereseal, as well as a list of all the OD&D classes in other sources.

 

Bard

Bards are an essential part of the Robrenn culture. They are played using the thief character class as a starting point. The bard must choose music, singing, and storytelling skills, but he does not have the backstabbing and pickpocket abilities.

At 3rd level, the bard gains the charm person ability once per day, as per the magic-user spell. He affects a number of Hit Dice or levels equal to one-third his own level (rounded down). The attempt requires the bard to recite poems, sing, or play an instrument for three rounds. He must make a skill check on the weakest of his three mandatory skills. If he fails the skill check, his victims get a +3 to their saving throws. The bard fails completely if interrupted or wounded. Likewise, the bard may use this ability to negate another bard’s charm attempt.

At 9th level, the bard may extend his charm ability to intelligent monsters (except undead, as per the fourth-level wizard spell, charm monster). At 15th level, his ability extends to plants as well (as the seventh-level wizard spell, charm plants). A successful saving throw vs. spells always negates the charm.

The bard may use his charm ability to affect Morale (either a +2 bonus to his companions, or a -2 to his opponents), or their eagerness to fight ( + 1 to hit for his companions, or- 1 to hit for his opponents). These effects are automatic after three rounds (no save).

The bard can make a living from his trade. He can earn up to 5 cp per person every time he sings, plays his music, or tells stories in public (boost the reward to gold pieces if performing for a noble). He must make the appropriate skill check. If he fails, he gains nothing. If he succeeds, he makes 1 cp per person ( +1 cp per point scored under his skill). For example, a bard succeeding his skill check by a margin of two points would make 3 cp per person. If he uses his charm ability, assume he automatically succeeds, though if his skill check failed this bard will not be viewed very positively by his victims when the charm wears off.

 

Chameleon men

The wallaras (sometimes called chameleon men) are the oldest of the lizard kin races and are descended from dragons. Once a proud and wise race, the wallaras were reduced to their current primitive state through the action of the araneas. The wallaras inhabit the extensive grasslands on the northern shore of the Orc's Head Peninsula, far from human and demihuman civilizations, so the reclusive wallara do not have to work too hard to avoid contact with strangers.

Wallaras stand seven feet tall, and their spindly arms and legs make them look quite thin. Some folk think that they resemble tall, slender humans. They move with a stride that other races find gangling and awkward. Wallaras have multicolored, somewhat scaly skin with stripes of various shades of red, blue, indigo, green, yellow, violet, brown, orange, black, and white. Few wallaras have every hue; most have three or four predominant colors. The colors seem to shift and swirl when they walk. Hair is found only on their heads and may be a single color or as mottled and colorful as their skins. They wear loincloths or simple shifts, usually carry net or kangaroo bags with their personal necessities, and occasionally don jewelry. Wallaras never show any sign of discoloration from the Red Curse.

The wallaras are a wise people who value the land and their place in it. They are physically active, sometimes walking all day while hunting or gathering food. They are also meditative and spiritual, honoring their Immortal patrons through dance and song. Wallaras can be quite serious but most of them have a humorous side as well, laughing at themselves as easily as at their fellows. Levelheaded and practical though they may be, wallaras can be very superstitious, following rituals and customs that seem nonsensical to outsiders. Because most wallaras follow tribal customs and taboos, lawful alignments predominate. Quite a few are neutral. A very few of them are chaotic.

Wallaras can be nomadic hunter-gatherers, settled villagers who raise crops in addition to hunting, or residents of the ancient city of Risilvar. The latter study the old paintings and try to piece together clues from their past in addition to their other pursuits. Each village has a population of 20 to 80 wallaras led by a headman chosen for his wisdom. He rules along with a council of elders.

All wallaran settlements feature a magical site called a tookoo. The tookoo of a clan is the equivalent of a temple to many other races. The tookoo of a cave-dwelling clan might be a special grotto that glistens with arcane crystals. Forest dwellers might revere an ancient tree of strong magic. These sites always radiate magic and enable chameleon men to fight with a +2 bonus for both attack and damage rolls. When fighting for their tookoos or homes, their morale rises to 12. Wallaran government, such as it is, also centers around the tookoo. If a clan has an important decision to make, all the members of the clan will gather in the tookoo. They will remain there until they reach a decision by consensus. They will carefully explore all the issues and ramifications of a decision, one that is best for everyone involved.

Once a year, chameleon men shed their skins, much as lizards do. They save the skin for a vital purpose: reproduction. As the race has no female gender, they reproduce by placing their old skins in their clan's tookoo. Each offering has a 5% chance of magically budding into a young wallara, which grows to maturity in just eight weeks. The new wallara then stays with the tribe for at least a year to learn a trade.

Wallara live in quiet harmony with nature. A Herathian spell reduced them to a stone-age level of development, and they are just now beginning to rediscover their past. They enjoy games of all sorts. When they war among themselves, the battle is stylized and designed to let out frustrations and grievances without causing a great deal of harm to anyone.

At some point during their lives, most wallaras experience a sort of wanderlust and leave for a period of time to explore the world. This is known as going on walkabout. Even while on walkabout, wallaras rarely leave the grasslands. A wallara on walkabout is almost always accompanied by a wallaran spirit. These spirits also protect wallaras from some of the denizens of the Dimension of Nightmare; wallaras will never be attacked by malferas unless they initiate combat.

Wallaras enjoy watching over old woods, caverns, and places of natural beauty. They attempt to maintain the harmony of nature while piecing together the puzzle of their past. Individual wallaras will often devote their entire lives to nurturing and caring for a particular location, type of animal, or species of plant. They subsist on small game, fish, and crops they grow. Less scrupulous wizards prize wallaran skin as a component for making robes of blending.

 From dragons, wallara inherited several innate magical powers. An adult tribesman has the ability to vanish, which is roughly equivalent to the dimension door spell. The difference lies in its shorter range (120’ instead of 360’). Also, because it is a racial ability, chameleon men never accidentally materialize into solid objects. However, for game balance, this ability counts as a full action and should require an Intelligence check every time it is used.

At 3rd level, a chameleon man can truly mimic its surroundings. The chameleon man effectively turns invisible as per the mage spell. Although the chameleon man can use this ability at will, any number of times in a day, he must remain absolutely quiet and motionless when doing so (he cannot cast spells, talk, attack, dodge, move, vanish, etc). Chameleon men have perfecteability to remain motionless for extended periods of time (up to an hour per experience level). Mimicry only fools other races - chameleon men can always see one another.

At 7th level, a chameleon man can dream. Once this ability has been used, it cannot be used again for seven days. The dream allows the chameleon man to tap into mystical knowledge of Wallara spirits.

At the chameleon man’s option, the dream can imitate the effects of one of the following clerical spells: speak with animal, speak with the dead, speak with plants, commune, or speak with monsters. Dreaming requires the chameleon man to meditate for 1d6 rounds, plus the time spent communicating. The meditation requires live embers (from a small campfire for example). Dreams cannot be used against hostile creatures unless such creatures are restrained in some manner.

Medicine Men: Chameleon men of Wallara have their own types of spellcasters, called medicine men. These gifted people are identified at birth by other medicine men. They learn their first spell when they become adults (level 0), Medicine men can cast clerical and druidic spells, but cannot turn undead. In order to cast a spell, medicine men need a small piece of quartz or opal that is consumed when the spell is cast. Supplies of these minerals can usually be acquired in caverns, near great rocks, or in the Forbidden Highlands. They must perform a corroboree (fire ceremony) to recover their spells. Medicine men also can use their dream ability to imitate the effects of the druidic control weather or creeping doom spells.

Medicine men can always sense if a place is often visited by spirit servitors of their chosen Immortal patron (60' radius). As an option, adult medicine men also acquire special clerical powers specific to their chosen Immortal patron, as described on page 13 of the “Codex of the Immortals” in the Wrath of the Immortals boxed set. If the Star Dragon is the chosen patron, give the medicine men a permanent protection from evil rather than a +2 bonus to turn undead.

Miscellaneous: Chameleon men were originally described in AC9 Creature Catalog, pages 33-34. Chameleon men are poor swimmers (requiring a skill slot to learn how to swim). Chameleon men do not have infravision and their natural armor class is 9 like humans. They strongly dislike armor as it cancels both their ability to vanish and to mimic. They use stone or bone daggers, spears with stone edges, clubs, and - for the typical Wallara - the boomerang. Chameleon men have racial modifiers to their game statistics, as shown in Table 4. Chameleon men have a height of 82+1d4 inches and a weight of 2,000 + 2d6x10 cn. They begin play at an age of 1d4 years and may live to be 75 + 7d20 years old.

Language: If you haven’t caught on by now, the best way to imitate Wallara lingo would be to pick a good map of the land down-under, and check for native names. Grab a bunch, shake well, and there you have it - but beware! You might very well end up creating true words with ludicrous meanings! Chameleon men also can use the changing colors of their skin to show feelings. Proper usage of shades and hues is a sign of wisdom and social status among chameleon men.

Shields: Chameleon men do not normally carry shields. However, quarrels do occur at times and medicine men allow two forces with an equal number of chameleon men and comparable armament to do battle to settle their dispute. Shields are used at that time. They are medium-sized shields, made of wood and bark, offering the usual AC protection. Shields +1 exist that match the owner’s mimicry ability. Tribal leaders are likely to own one. Note: Nonmagical shields do hamper a chameleon man’s vanishing and mimicry abilities. Chameleon men are otherwise free to use any magical protection other than armor to improve their AC.

 

Chameleon Man Levels

Level

-1

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

XP

-2,000

0

2,000

8,000

17,000

34,000

72,000

144,000

300,000

600,000

900,000*

HD

1d8

2d8

3d8

4d8

-

5d8

6d8

7d8

-

d8d

+2 hp**

Special Abilities

-

Vanish

-

-

Mimic

-

-

-

Dream

-

-

 

* +300,000 XP per extra level.

** +2 hit point per level thereafter; Constitution bonus no longer applies.

Note that Constitution bonuses should be added only when the PC is created and every time it gains a new level, up to level 8

 

Chameleon Men's Statistics

 

Abilities

Race Max.

Chameleon Men

Medicine Men

St

17

-1

-1

In

16

-

-

Wi

18

-

+1

DX

18

+1

-

Co

18

-

-

Ch

18*

-

-

 

*Charisma applies only between chameleon men; otherwise, penalize Charisma by -1 when dealing with other humanoids, -2 when dealing with demihumans or humans

 

Medicine Man (Mendoo) Levels

 

 

 

 

Spells per level

Level

XP

HD

1

2

3

4

5

-1

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

-3,000

0

3,000

12,000

24,000

48,000

96,000

192,000

380,000

680,000

980,000*

1d8

2d8

3d8

4d8

-

5d8

6d8

7d8

-

8d8

+2 hp*

-

1

2

2

2

2

2

3

3

3

3

-

-

-

1

2

2

2

2

3

3

3

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

2

2

3

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

2

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

 

* +300,000 XP per extra level.

** +2 hit point per level thereafter; Constitution bonus no longer applies.

Note that Constitution bonuses should be added only when the PC is created and every time it gains a new level, up to level 8

 

Defender

Similar to the paladin, a defender is a high-level fighter who swears fealty to a Neutral church. The defender differs from the paladin in the following respects:

  1. The defender must be of Neutral alignment.
  2. The defender has the ability to remove fear (reversible) instead of the paladin's detect evil.
  3. The defender can learn spells from his church if he has the appropriate Wisdom. However, he must pay 5000 gp per level learned.
  4. The defender cannot turn undead.

 

Druidic knights

Only neutral traveling fighters may become druidic knights. They must have adopted the philosophy of the druids prior to reaching knighthood and must swear fealty to a prince, king, or emperor faithful to the ways of the druids. A druidic knight may not wield metallic weapons nor wear metallic armor and shields. The knight must use wooden armor and weapons magically shaped and hardened by the druids. These items are usually lacquered or varnished, and include curvilinear decorations, delicate leaf carvings, and

fine scrollwork tooled into the wood. The knight must repay the druids for these precious items, usually in terms of several years of routine service when not called upon by a liege. In addition to all obligations and advantages common to knights, a druidic knight also has the following abilities:

-A knight can detect danger (as per the druidic spell) once per hour, simply by concentrating (range of 5’ per spell-casting level). The knight cannot use that ability and attack on the same round.

-If the knight’s Wisdom score is 13 or more, the character can cast spells (from the druidic spell list only) as if he were a druid of one-third his actual experience level (rounded down). If a fighter becomes a druidic knight right at 9th level, he’ll immediately gain the druidic spells of a 3rd-level druid. With a lesser Wisdom score, the fighter can still be a druidic knight but will have no spell-casting ability.

-The druidic knight learns how to meditate and cast spells as druids would. He can do so at someone’s behest, but at a price - set at the DM’s discretion - that must involve a service to nature or to woodland beings.

-Druidic knights cannot turn undead.

-Druidic hirelings may include demihumans (especially halflings or elves) and woodland beings. A druidic knight cannot have more Hit-Dice worth of hirelings than his druidic spell-casting level. In other words, if a druidic knight can cast spells as a 3rd-level druid, he may not have more than 3 HD worth of hirelings accompany him.

-The druidic knight must assist any woodland being asking for help with two exceptions: He does not have to help creatures opposed to the druidic philosophy and goals; and if the knight is on a mission for a higher authority (such as on a quest, serving a duke, etc.), he may offer only a small amount of help. Assistance never involves the donation of money or items, only the offering of personal services for a short time.

-A druid of the Ninth Circle or higher may summon a (Robrenn) knight to escort him to gatherings at the Hallowed Forest of Carnuilh. The knight must remain with the druid until the end of the celebration. This call supersedes that of a liege.

 

Ee’aar

Except for a pair of very large, feathered wings, ee'aar appear to be stocky elves. They posses the typical elven arched eyebrows, pointed ears, quick reflexes, and natural grace in movement. Though ee'aar eye color follows typical elf shades, it is of a paler wash than usual. The predominant hair color is silver or white, though some have been known to have lighter shades of auburn and blonde. Their eyes are amber, violet, or deep green. Ee'aar also tend toward lean, well-muscled bodies and are slightly taller than their earthbound relatives. An ee’aar’s wing spreads out almost 30% longer than the elf’s entire body length. When folded, ee’aar wings stretch from their heels to several inches above their heads. They obviously cannot be concealed, other than by magic. Though feathers tend to be lighter in color - mostly white, gray, and light blue - perhaps as many as 40% of the ee'aar possess darker shades - such as brown, gold, and black.

Typical ee'aar are reclusive, preferring the company of their own kind. Those who choose to adventure on the Savage Coast have overcome this tendency enough to associate with others but still tend to be very private. Ee'aar are curious and regard all nature as wondrous and worth protecting. They pity those who cannot fly and do not understand people who voluntarily spend time beneath the ground, away from sky and sun. Most ee'aar are very vibrant, full of humor, and unafraid to show their emotions.

Ee’aar can be used as player characters. They function as standard elves, except for the limitations given below, plus a 15% penalty to all gained experience.

The ee’aar have adapted to the cold environment of their high mountains, wearing no more than light, down-lined fur tunics, soft leather boots, and thick tights. If caught in a severe storm, ee’aar can kneel in rocky recesses and protect their bodies with their wings. It takes months of discomfort for an ee’aar to get used to the warmth and humidity of the lowlands, especially in tropical regions.

Most ee'aar have had little contact with races native to the Savage Coast, so they have no preconceived notions or pronounced racial preferences. They are friendly with enduks, who also now live on the Arm of the Immortals. They tend to like phanatons and wallara and pity the wingless elves and half-elves. They sometimes slightly fear gator men, lupins, and rakastas, because they resemble creatures that prey on birds, creatures that would prey on ee'aar if they could. They do not care for manscorpions due to those creatures' betrayal of their friends, the enduks.

Ee’aar commonly fight with weapons of 60 cn. encumbrance or less. They gain a + 1 on attack rolls with normal swords and one of their clan’s hunting weapons (pick one of the following: lasso, net, bolas, blowgun, or spear). Ee’aar can use short bows without penalty (but no bonus, either) and generally avoid bulky weapons like the long bow or two-handed weapons. An ee'aar can still fly while wearing leather or studded leather, but not anything bulkier. Special elven chain mail (made with glassteel enchanted glass) can also be worn without impediment. If purchased by an ee'aar in Aeryl, this special elven chain mail costs the same as normal chain mail. Ee'aar rarely use bulky armor and never use shields, because their desire for mobility is quite strong.

As with all flying creatures, they must land after losing 50% or more of their hit points. They cannot fly at all if they lose more than 75% of their hit points. They suffer an extra 1d6 points of damage per round if their wings are exposed to flames. The wings keep burning until the ee’aar has lost more than 75% of its hit points or until someone helps the victim, with a blanket to smother the fire, a gust of wind to blow it out, or water to extinguish it. Recovering from fire damage takes a week for each 10% damage to the ee’aar’s total hit points. For example, a 40-hp ee’aar suffered 32 points of fire damage. A total of eight weeks will be needed to heal the wings (32/4 = 8). Cure wounds spells only cure the wounds, but do not regrow feathers; a cureall spell is required for feathers to regrow. As an option, the hit-point bonus for high Constitution scores can be used to reduce the number of days per week of healing. For example, if the wounded ee’aar mentioned above had a 17 Constitution, the 8 weeks healing time would be shorter by 16 days (bonus of 2 x 8 weeks = 16 days). In D&D game terms, ee’aar have a maneuverability of 2(b) when flying, and an air speed of 80 yards per round (level flight), or approximately 20 yards climbing and double-speed diving. Ee’aar can carry up to 500 cn plus 50 cn. per point of Strength and fly without penalty. Above that, their speed and maneuverability drop to 40 and 2(c). The maximum weight ee’aar can carry and still maintain flight capability is 500 cn plus 100 cn. per point of Strength. Ee’aar must make a Constitution check for every hour of flight. If they fail, they must land and rest a half-hour for each two hours of previous flight. Their Constitution checks are subject to a penalty of -1 for each 500 cn. (or fraction of) carried in flight beyond the first 500. However, if favorable winds are present (like updrafts in the mountains, or a strong sea breeze), Ee’aar can simply glide, in which case they benefit from a +4 bonus to their Constitution checks. In other words, ee’aar with Constitutions of 16+ could conceivably fly forever - that is as long as winds are favorable! They suffer a further penalty to their Constitution checks, of -1 per 5,000 ft. of altitude, above the first 5,000. Ee’aar cannot fly above 20,000 ft.

Wings are AC9 (minus any Dexterity bonus). Wings cannot be hit by a frontal attack, unless the attacker is taller than the PC. If a flank attack misses but is still good enough to hit the wings’ AC, then the wings are hit. A back attack is always done against the wings. Ee’aar are subject to claustrophobia when confined to closed environments like dungeons. They must make a Wisdom check at the end of each day in a dungeon environment or become temporarily insane. Insanity can be cured with cureall, cure disease or cure insanity spells. The fourth missed check during one stay in such an environment causes permanent insanity that cannot be cured by any means short of a limited wish or wish spell.

Most ee'aar speak several languages. All know Aeryla, the standard ee'aar language, which is very soft and musical and carries well on the winds and can be understood by anyone knowing elvish. Ee'aar also grow up around Nimmush. Other languages would be those of any mountain-dwelling race or those races along the western edge of the Savage Coast.

All adults have an interruptible light spell cast on their chest. Originally, Aeryl taught the ee’aar how to use flickering lights to communicate with the Kingdom of Faerie. The ee’aar began using the lights to communicate among each other during the night or to blind and frighten nocturnal monsters. Each family within a clan has a specific blinking rate that identifies them to other clans. It is their version of heraldry. Lately, King Enerin has instructed his scouts to use their magical lights to imitate certain stars and fool sea explorers to sail farther away from the ee’aar homeland. This has caused several ships to run aground in dangerous, orc-infested regions.

Male ee'aar are 54 + 1d10 inches in height and weigh 950 + 2d6x10 cn (reduce height by 4 inches and weight by 200 cn for females). They have the same lifespan as normal elves.

 

Elven class variants

Elven clerics: Elven characters may be created as clerics or druids who are able to retain some of their racial abilities (infravision, languages, detection, and immunity to ghoul paralysis). All other racial abilities are lost (fighter combat options, special defenses, and wizardly spell-casting). Elven clerics use the Elven Experience Table, but cast clerical spells, fight, and save clericor druids of the same level. In all other respects, they have all the normal abilities, restrictions, and obligations common to clerics. Druids can be created using the same guidelines.

Elven paladins/avengers: Between 9th and 12th levels inclusive (or at Attack Rank E), an elf may become either a paladin, if Lawful, or an avenger, if Chaotic. As with paladins or avengers, the elf must swearfealtto a church. When this is done, the elf gains abilities, restrictions, and obligations specific to paladins and avengers; this includes clerical spellcasting if the elf has a Wisdom score of 13 or better. The elf retains all normal elven abilities, including attack ranks, special defenses, and wizardly spell-casting. He uses the Elven Experience Table, with each new attack rank becoming the equivalent of one new experience level for purposes of clerical spell-casting. For example, an elven paladin with attack rank K would be able to cast spells like a 6th-level cleric, in addition to his wizardly spell-casting. The optional rules on page 266 of the Rules Cyclopedia on unlimited demihumans’ experience could be used otherwise. They are simpler and fit the case of the elven paladin or avenger better, but should be used from 1st level on.

Important: The elf permanently ceases to gain new levels in wizardly spells upon swearing fealty to a church. The elf also loses one level of wizardly spells each time he gains a new level of clerical spells, other than the ones gained upon swearing fealty.

For example: A 9th-level elf can normally cast fifth-level wizardly spells. Upon swearing fealty to the Order of Tiuz, that elf becomes a paladin with the addition of 1st-level clerical spells. When reaching 12th level (or Attack Rank E), the elf would gain the ability to cast second-level clerical spells, but would lose all fifth-level wizardly spells. This represents the effects of the time spent studying clerical scriptures, meditating, praying, and acting as a paladin or an avenger, which inevitably alters the elf’s skills and experience in magic-use. Remember that the elf can no longer swear fealty at level 13 (Attack Rank F) or better. It is assumed the elf has lingered too long in the ways of magic and profane warfare, and thus can no longer faithfully embrace the ways of the church. Using the optional rules, the best an elven paladin or avenger could ever achieve is 12th-level clerical spell-casting, with four first-level spells and four second-level spells (or three first-level spells if using the standard elven attack ranks). This assumes the elf swore fealty to a church at level 12. An elf who swears fealty at 9th level must eventually lose all wizardly spellcasting ability and related skills. An elf who makes this ultimate sacrifice, either willingly or because of the rules mechanics, permanently gains enough Wisdom to reach a score of 13, or gains one single extra point of Wisdom (up to a maximum of 18). Once lost, magic-use cannot be regained without permanently losing the status and abilities of the paladin or avenger (including any Wisdom gains), and spending a whole game year in studies for each of the spell levels originally lost. During that time, the “fallen champion” may not gain any experience nor learn any new spells. Elves may also become druidic knights, using these guidelines.

Knights: An elf can also become a knight in the service of a monarch. The elf can do so upon swearing fealty, with no alteration to the basic elven character class. Elven knights prefer elven monarchs, but otherwise may swear fealty to a human monarch, although the latter is rare.

 

Enduk

Standing six to seven feet tall, enduks are smaller and lighter than regular minotaurs though still very muscular. The head of an enduk resembles that of a bull - with horns, a square muzzle, large, heavily-lidded eyes, and a strong mouth filled with large teeth. Long, coarse hair tufts at the throat and shoulders, running in a mane the back. The head of an enduk is most often spotted and splotched with white and black, though features such as the eyes and muzzle are highlighted in brown. Their fur is usually light brown, ranging to black but a very few have creamy-white fur. Enduk wings are feathered black, white, or a shade of gray or blue-gray. Hair (and beard, for males) is coifed into curled rows. Both males and females have horns; these stick out from the sides of their heads (rather than curling close) and are usually ivory-white, though some are yellow, light brown, or gray. White-furred enduks have pearly horns. Horns are 1d6+12 inches long. They typically have brown eyes, though some have black irises. An enduk's foot has only two large toes, both with hooflike coverings. Their hands look human but have thick, black nails. Enduks are carnivores and have sharp teeth. The typical enduk is a religious individual; most are Lawful. They are not very trusting and seldom make friends among the wingless. Enduks are honorable and go to great lengths to keep any promises they make.

Their bodies are covered with short fur ranging from black to light brown. Enduks also possess huge, powerful wings. Atypical enduk wingspan measures from eight to ten feet, and when folded, the wings reach from the ground to one foot over the enduk's head. Feather color varies from white to black, including various shades of gray. The underside of an enduk's wings usually bears a design that they show off by spreading their wings when on the ground. These marks tend to be genetic and can convey information about an enduk's family. The enduks put family ahead of other concerns. Enduks take a mate for life, rarely taking a second even if the first dies. A couple will average one child every few years - four to six young over their lifetime together. Normally one enduk represents the entire extended family for purposes of organized government, whether it is a local organization or a temporary clan-council responsible for matters concerning all enduks. (The last clan-council to be held was over the matter of returning to Nimmur.) This leader is generally an enduk who has lost a mate, or never took one, and has embraced a more martial and possibly religious lifestyle. Sometimes, a mated pair will devote their lives to such pursuits, both becoming leaders for the family.

Enduk are typically stoic creatures unless enraged. They get along well with all other races except the manscorpions, who have possibly earned the eternal animosity of the enduks. Their philosophy demands an ascetic life of peasantry, which ties in with the enduk religion - worship of their patron Immortal, Idu (Ixion), and reverence of their greatest leader, Gildesh. The conflict with the manscorpions has forced the enduks into a higher level of craftsmanship and commerce. The enduks are natural metalsmiths, making some of the best tools and weapons available. Mostly they work with regular steel, but with their return to the Savage Coast, they have begun crafting red steel weapons. Enduks do not make items specifically for trade with other races yet, so most weapons and tools are created for enduk physique. Still, these items are gaining a following in the surrounding lands as trade items.

The enduk have their own language, Nimmush (Homespeak). This guttural, heavy dialect requires a range that few outside their own race can command. Most enduks also know common and Aeryla, the language of the ee'aar. Though most rarely bother to learn any further languages, some enduks maintain their knowledge of the manscorpion's language (Nimmurian), in case it should prove useful in winning back their homeland.

Enduks can be used as player characters. They can either be clerics or fighters, and must be Lawful. A 20% penalty must be applied to their experience tables. They get a +2 to their initial Strength scores (up to 18 maximum), and a -2 to their Dexterity. A minimum Strength and Constitution of 14 are required, regardless of the chosen class. These characters should never be started at less than 4th level of experience in any class. In other words, such a character could be brought into an already existing party of 4th-level PCs. It couldnot be crfor use with a party of standard 1st-level characters. Enduks can fight with weapons of 120 cn. encumbrance or less when flying. They do not use bows under any circumstances. Crossbows can be used in flight, but must be reloaded on the ground. Enduks prefer fighting on foot (they have a -2 penalty on attack rolls when flying). They can use any other weapon allowed by their chosclass whnot flying. They also can use their horns to gore an opponent for 1d4 + 1 points of damage. They may wear armor specially made for their winged-bodies, but do not use shields. Their armor generally costs and weighs twice the normal amounts. They have a natural armor class of 6. Addition of body armor of AC6 or worse does not improve the enduk’s natural AC. For armor of AC5 or better, use the AC rating of the armor worn. Their wings have the same armor class, etc., as the ee’aar above. Damage to flying creatures applies normally, as well as recovery from fire damage (as explained earlier for the ee’aar). Enduks have a MF of 2(c) when flying and an air speed of 60 yards per round (level flight), or approximately 10 yards climbing and double-speed diving. They can carry up to 2,000 cn. plus 100 cn. per point of Strength and still fly without penalty. Above that number, their speed and maneuverability drop to 30 and 1(c). The maximum weight a enduk can carry and maintain flight capability is 2,000 cn. plus 200 cn. per point of Strength.

The enduks are much heavier than their ee’aar counterparts. They must make a Constitution check for every turn of continuous flight. Their Constitution checks are subject to the same bonuses and penalties as for the ee’aar, except for the penalty on weight ( -1 for every 1,000 cn. carried). Enduks cannot fly above 10,000 ft., but they could glide from that altitude if needed. Enduks do not suffer from claustrophobia as ee’aar do.

Enduks have excellent eyesight, and can note details from a distance of half a mile.

Male enduks are 66 + 4d6 inches high and weigh 2,200 + 2d20x10 cn (females are 2 inches shorter and 200 cn. lighter. They begin play at the age of 20 + 2d8 years and can reach the age of 200 + 1d100.

 

Half-Elves

Contrary to common belief, there is a race of “half-elves” unknown to Alfheim elves. These rare people live among elven and human communities in the Savage Coast. Fredar and Fredara made the characteristics of this mixture permanent and hereditary in an attempt to create a more homogeneous kingdom in Eusdria. The half-elven gene is dominant (thus, if only one of the parents is a half-elf, the progeny has a 65% chance of being a half-elf). Although still rare in Eusdria, this race is slowly gaining in numbers. Fredar and Fredara are their usual Immortal patrons. Half-elves have infravision but no other elven abilities. They usually speak both the local elven and human tongues, and other languages can be acquired through the normal use of skill points. Half-elves have the life-span of halflings; otherwise treat half-elves as humans with slightly pointy ears. All classes normally open to humans are available to half-elves. Half-elves should suffer a 5% penalty to their experience because of their infravision and extended longevity.

 

Herathian aranea

In arachnid form, araneas range from 3 to 6 feet long. Two spinnerets are located on the abdomen. Eight large, segmented legs attach to the spider's thorax. Two smaller appendages, each about 2 feet long, sprout from the front of the thorax beneath the mandibles and eyes, each ending in four, multiple-jointed fingers and a single thumb. These can manipulate simple tools or cast spells. Araneas also boast an impressive set of mandibles and eight eyes, four of which are small, used only to detect motion. The other four resemble human eyes with colored iris and black pupil, though set in around, lidless socket. Two of the larger eyes face directly forward, while the other six eyes are positioned on either side of the aranea's head. The head, body, and legs are all covered with a coarse, grayish-black hair.

The araneas of the Savage Coast are a secret race; no one knows that they really exist, because these araneas have learned to take the shape of humanoid creatures when dealing with outsiders. (Note: “Humanoid” throughout the following text includes humans, demihumans, goblinoids, rakastas, tortles, lupins, etc.). Araneas are spiderfolk, highly intelligent beings that look like human-sized spiders in their natural shape. Over the centuries, araneas learned to use magic to subdue their environment. They also developed a unique culture that, if cold and amoral, remains nevertheless quite pragmatic. Araneas are predators to whom humanoid flesh remains a delicacy. Because of this and their clearly arachnid morphology, other races loathe the very mention of araneas. Unruly children from rakasta cottages to goblin yurts are often told stories about how scary araneas come and take away disrespectful youngsters.

Had the araneas not learned to conceal their identities, the neighboring realms would have annihilated the aranean nation long ago. Today, araneas of the Savage Coast are thought to be the stuff of legends, mere mythology of the past. Thus, as the aranean nation grew, laws and customs that reflected their behavior and mentality were created. The young araneas of Herath are taught from birth that they are two different people. One is the true aranea, the other is a humanoid alter-ego. The aranea’s two personalities are very distinct, with two separate sets of histories and personal experiences that the aranea learns to accept as legitimate identities. This is done to ensure that the aranea will play its alter-ego’s role to perfection in order to better fool outsiders. Indeed, the practice has largely succeeded’ thanks in a great part to the araneas’ superior intellect. However, the practice does present a risk. Some araneas develop split personalities. When this happens to an aranea, it no longer knows it has a second personality and forgets what it did under its other personality. A psychotic aranea will almost always revert to its natural mind and shape when in presence of araneas in arachnid shape (95% chance). If it fails, it becomes permanently insane in that it forever forgets about its true nature and everything pertaining to araneas, save perhaps some common humanoid legends and folklore about araneas. So deeply ingrained is the aranea’s double-personality teaching that a psychotic aranea will always shut down its aranean self and switch to its humanoid alter-ego when in presence of outsiders. (One of the secret aranean laws demands that araneas switch to their humanoid form whenever they prepare to leave the Forest of the Magus.) A further limitation exists on an aranea’s shape-changing ability. It can switch only between its two specific alter egos; it cannot use humanoid or aranean identities other than the two given it at birth by aranean sages. These two original identities are chosen in accordance with the aranea’s family lineage. The race must be one the araneas are familiar with. Size differences limit the araneas to races ranging between halfling and gnoll. The most common choices include human, elf, half-elf, dwarf, lupin, rakasta, and lizard man. Few araneas choose a goblinoid form, and because of magical restrictions on the race, none imitate wallaras. The alter ego's gender must be the same as the aranea's. Height, weight, eye and hair color are always appropriate for the race being imitated. An aranea of noble birth will be given a noble humanoid identity (e.g., the family of a “human” baron is most likely to be a single aranean family). Aranean imitation and acting are so good that an aranea can hardly can tell whether or not a character met for the first time is an aranea. Furthermore, if wounded or killed in humanoid form, an aranea does not revert back to its arachnid body. Dispel magic cast at 20th level or higher is necessary to force an aranea to adopt its true form. This fosters a certain element of confusion very useful to intruding adventurers.

Although these creatures are better suited as NPCs to annoy and torment your favplayer chawith, they could be a challenge to role-play among a group of unsuspecting adventurers. Use the magic-user’s experience progression table, with a 50% penalty (rounded down) to all experience gained for the sake of game balance. Araneas were described in the AC9 Creature Catalogue as 3-HD monsters. Let’s assume these are a separate species of NPCs. araneas would start with thesame game statistics and abilities as human magic-users, with the racial abilities listed as follow. These differences apply only to araneas in their natural form. An aranea can cast spells in both forms. In humanoid form, treat an aranea as a normal human magic-user. If mimicking elves, rakastas, or lupins, be aware that the PC’s number of Hit Dice and the combat tables will remain those of a human magic-user. Otherwise, the shape-changed araneas do benefit from the race’s special abilities (e.g., increased dexterity and claw/claw/bite routine for rakastas, secret door detection and infravision for elves, improved senses of hearing and smelling for lupins, etc.).

Aranean racial abilities

Level 1: Araneas can shape-change at will between their two alter-egos. The change requires a full game turn. Araneas have multiple sets of eyes that provide infravision, secret-door detection, and wide-angle vision (araneas can be surprised only on a roll of 1 on 1d10). They can climb walls without the help of tools like thieves of the same level, and can cling to ceilings with a -40% penalty to the climbing roll.

Level 2: An aranea can build a sticky web (or a cocoon) or secrete a silk strand. It does so at the rate of one square foot per round for the web, or 20’ per round for the single strand. The aranea can hang at one end of the strand and descend as it secretes the strand. The strand is as strong as a normal rope, with half the encumbrance. The aranea can climb up its strand at its normal web movement rate. The web functions like a web spell for creatures running or falling into it. The web must be large enough to cover the entire creature or else it rips apart. Without constant care, an aranean web lasts a week, after which it dries up and falls apart. Araneas can move at their web movement rate on any giant arachnid web. They can also toss a small sticky web (no more than 3’ × 3 ‘); treat as a basic skill with nets (Rules Cyclopedia, page 79).

Level 3: Aranean venom becomes potent enough to affect creatures of ½ HD or more. The venom causes paralysis (saving throw vs. poison to negate) that lasts one game turn per level of the aranea.

Level 5: Araneas can freely sense the presence of and control normal spiders (up to 4 HD worth). This is done at will, as long as normal spiders exist within 30’ of the aranea (no save). This does not include giant types or other monstrous arachnids.

Level 7: Once a day, araneas can summon normal spiders regardless of the situation. They arrive magically within 1d4 rounds as a single, crawling mass. Treat as an insect swarm for game purposes (Rules Cyclopedia, page 187).

Level 9: The aranea’s poison becomes lethal. If the victim fails to save against paralysis, the victim must then roll a second saving vs. poison. If the second saving throw fails, the victim dies within 1d4 turns. The lethal effects of the poison affect only creatures with the same number or fewer Hit Dice as the aranea. Level 12: The summoning and controlling of spiders also applies to nonmagical giant spiders. The aranea magically attracts a number of Hit Dice of giant spiders equal to or less than one third its experience level, once per day.

Araneas must be Neutral or Chaotic, use skill slots to acquire the ability to speak to normal and giant spiders (one skill slot covers both), and reach a score of 18 in Acting as soon as possible. The Acting skill is based upon the araneas’ natural Charisma scores. Araneas gain a +2 bonus to Dexterity and Intelligence (up to 18), but suffer a -2 penalty to Strength and Constitution. These game statistics apply to both alter-egos. Roll up the aranea’s natural Charisma as usual. The Charisma of the humanoid alter-ego is initially equal to 8 (use the aranea’s natural Charisma if 7 or less). Each time the aranea gains a new level of experience’ it may make an Acting skill check. If successful, the aranea permanently increases its humanoid alter-ego’s Charisma by one point, up to 18. Note that the alter ego’s Charisma can be higher than the aranea’s natural Charisma. In their natural form, araneas have a Charisma of 3 to outsiders. In natural form, an aranea's height is 44"+1d10"; its weight is equal to that of the alter ego. Beginning aranea characters are 15+4d4 years old; their maximum age is 200+2d100 years.

 

Lupin

Lupins look like furred humans with canine heads. Their short fur ranges from tan to black, with rare instances of white. An individual lupin's fur is usually one color, perhaps with some small touches of another lighter color around the muzzle, hands, and feet, but a few individuals have spots. Like humans, lupins have comparatively long hair on their heads. This is often a shade darker than the lupin's body fur, though it turns gray or white with age. Lupins with pure white coats are often natural spellcasters. Those gifted in this way are nearly always adopted by magic-users or clerics and taught the appropriate craft. Lupins usually wear their hair long and straight, though braids are not unusual. Lupins are built much like humans, and their eyes resemble human eyes, with irises of blue, brown, or green. They also have short tails, about 2 feet long. A lupin's limbs are human in appearance, though the hands are furred on the back and have dark, leathery palms, and the feet are furred on top and have leathery soles. Lupin personalities range widely, but most tend to be loyal to friends and somewhat rude to strangers, testing their tolerance.

Lupins are on friendly terms with humans, elves, and dwarves. In Renardy, they do have occasional territorial disputes with the rakastas, but otherwise they bear them no animosity. They dislike phanatons, whose screeching hurts their ears, and they view cay-men, shazaks lizard men, gator men, and tortles as savages of varying degrees.

Lupin PCs are generated much as any other kind of character, using the racial ability modifiers given in Table 1. Unless stated otherwise, racial minimums and maximums are 3 and 18. Size and weight comes next since they are largely based upon the lupin’s breed and Strength score. Should you decide to make female characters a bit smaller, a 1” difference is recommended for lupins up to 60” tall, 2”-3” if taller. A lupin’s weight requires a bit more calculation, but it is also based upon size and Strength. Example: The doggerman is listed as 57 plus Strength. A 13 Strength doggerman would then stand 70” tall. Its weight is listed as SizexStrength. This means multiply the lupin’s basic height in inches time its Strength score. Then divide the total by the indicated number. This doggerman should therefore (57*13)/0.38=1950 cn.. Table 1 provides unencumbered movement rates for each breed, the damage caused by a bite attack, and the general keenness of their sensory skills. The latter are detailed in Table 2. Table 1 also provides a random NPC generator for both Known World or Savage Coast encounters. Roll one d20 to determine what lupin group is involved and a second to determine the specific breed. Note: The basic lupin statistics are included here as a comparison with the other breeds. It is assumed the basic lupin is only one of the many mongrels. Should you decide to use this material, the basic lupin should then no longer be available. Instead, roll up a random mongrel. Table 3 lists the classes available to the various lupin groups. Finally, Tables 4 and 5 delve into the possibility of determining a lupin’s lineage and its game effects. All Lupins begin with a penalty of –2000 XP, and gain 2 HD at 1st level. Add a penalty of 5% to required experience.

Howling: if outdoors, lupins may use their baying to communicate simple messages to others of their kind (1d4+1 words per round). Their ability to do so depends on their physicasizes (assuming larger the lupin, the more powerful the voice), weather conditions, terrain, and the hearing ability of the receiving lupin. A lupin must succeed a Hear Noise check to comprehend the message. If the attempt misses by 30% or more, the lupin doesn’t even hear or notice the howling at all. For every inch in size above 40”, of the howling lupi, add a bonus of +1%. If the howler isa bard, add another +10% bonus. If the howler is a beagle, add another 20% bonus. For each full mile of distance, apply a 10% penalty (under half a mile, add a 30% bonus instead). If there are trees, hills, winds, loud noises (a river for example) near the one listening, or other relevant obstacles, add penalties as appropriate or disallow the attempt altogether. If the listener is sleeping at the time, allow a 10% chance of waking up.

Wolfsbane repels lupins. The substance is even more poisonous to them than it is to humans. If a lupin ingests Wolfsbane make a saving throw vs. poison; failure indicates death, while success indicates a loss of 20 hit points. Fortunately, the keen senses of a lupin nearly always alert it in time to avoid ingesting the substance. If wolfsbane is somehow injected into a lupin's bloodstream, a failed saving throw causes a 50% drop in all ability scores for 1d3 days.

Lupins are classified in the following groups, most of which where self-explanatory: the Guardians (mostly warrior types, big, strong, but not geniuses), the Hunters (an important group as one would guess, with some of the most colorful and talented creatures to set a paw on this world), the Shepherds (these are the quieter types on whom everyone relies), the Workers (who found a niche for themselves in this old world), Vermin Hunters (I smiled when I ran across this entry; these are quick and adroit fellows who once made a life of scouring rats and other rodents), the Wee Folk (frail but diverse; these are gifted ones), the Nomads (now a very small group of tall, lanky characters, although fairly important in this region), and finally the Mongrels, listed last, but by no means the tail end of lupinkind.

Basset Hound, Royal: This ancient lupin breed once specialized in hunting close to the ground, mainly for rabbits. Some of the more imposing lupin breeds tend to look down on the royal bassets, as humans do halflings. They are, however, quite capable as hunters. They mastered the ability to hide in high grass or heavy vegetation when motionless (90% chance), and developed keen sight comparable to infravision, allowing them to see through vegetation as if it were mere darkness. Royal bassets have a free outdoor survival and hunting proficiencies. AL: Lawful

Beagle, Greater: This is one of the most adventuresome lupin breeds. Like the royal basset hound, the greater beagle originated from rabbit-hunting clans. Many wandered away for years to discover the world. One actually joined up as a pilot on the gnomish flying city of Serraine. Specially talented for howling, called “singing” among lupins, beagles make excellent bards. Beagles also have a free exploration proficiency. This Intelligence-based skill allows the greater beagle accurately to map and record discoveries, to communicate through sign-language, and to interact with natives naturally (+3 bonus to encounter reaction checks). Greater beagles also have an uncanny talent for stumbling onto interesting places (forgotten tombs or lost temples) or to witness unusual events (religious and other taboo ceremonies) often likely to get the greater beagle into some trouble. AL: Neutral or Chaotic ; generally good).

Bloodhound, Grand: Rumored to be the finest trackers, they make up for their generally placid temperament with an unusual tenacity. Grand bloodhounds proved very successful investigators for the King’s Gendarmes in Renardy. People say bloodhounds never give up on a fugitive of any sort. Twice a day, bloodhound characters may reroll a failed attempt to track or recognize a scent. Once per adventure, they also may follow a hunch with a successful Intelligence check. This allows them to come up with a new course of action when a party runs out of ideas to solve a problem. The solution may not necessarily make sense at the time. For example, a bloodhound may suddenly think that investigating a particular place or person overlooked earlier could help solve a problem. Although this may not be true, it could bring the party to witness useful events or discover other leads putting the party back on track. AL: Lawful or Neutral.

Blue Bandit: The blue bandit gained its Mystaran name from its short and curly dark blue fur. Contrary to the connotation of its Vermin Hunter classification, the blue bandit often remains an elegant lupin, often a gambler or a speculator. The breed’s most notorious individual, Arsane Lupin, is a debonair thief with charm and flair, and a weakness for rich ladies. Arsane, wanted by the Kings Gendarmes for years, has consistently managed to outfox the King’s bloodhounds - a remarkable feat. The blue bandit can mask his scent to send pursuers after the wrong lupin (automatic against any lupin tracker except bloodhounds, who suffer a 50% penalty instead). A blue bandit may have one of the following proficiencies free: gambling, forgery, or finances. The latter is an Intelligence-based skill for dealing with investments, banking, and business transactions. AL: Chaotic (not necessarily evil).

Borzoi, Nova-Svogan: This lupin, a shaggier long-runner, originated from a clan devoted to hunting werewolves in the great northern wastelands. To all lupins in general, lycanthropy remains an aberration, one that they perceive as an insult to their own natural origins, and which must be scoured from the world. The borzoi is the best suited for this task, since its saliva is harmful to all lycanthropes. As a result, Nova-Svogan borzoi fangs are equivalent to silver weapons when fighting lycanthropes. In addition, lycanthropes must succeed a saving throw vs. poison or temporarily lose a point of Constitution when bitten by a borzoi. When reaching a Constitution of zero, a lycanthrope reverts to its normal shape and passes out. Borzoi are immune to lycanthropy. A borzoi family that has reached noble status among Nova-Svoga society heads a secret werewolf-hunting sect. AL: Lawful.

Bouchon: This small lupin breed gained its notoriety on the Savage Coast as prestigious wine makers, thus the nickname bouchon (cork). A happy folk, this white powder-puff of a lupin easily gets along with anyone. Bouchon have developed a special resistance to liquor (treat as 19 Constitution), which they often use to fool others, and over the years the ability to resist poison as well (save vs poison as a dwarf). Bouchon PCs gain a free wine-making proficiency (similar to the brewing skill). AL: Chaotic (usually good).

Bulldog, Eusdrian: This is a rather large and heavy lupin version of the common bulldog. The Eusdrian bulldog is a burly worker, often with some degree of authority over common people (an innkeeper, a foreman on a construction site, a city official, the captain of a merchant ship, etc.). Usually strong and downright intimidating to many, it isn’t as tough or mean as it wants others to believe. The bulldog has a free intimidation proficiency (see the doggerman entry). Its thunderous bark also instills fear within a 30’ radius for 1d4 rounds (save vs. paralyzation to negate). AL: Any.

Burrow Bandit: Clans of burrow bandits are best at vermin hunting (foxes in particular, but also rabbits, moles, rats, and the like). They gained unequaled talent among lupinkind at finding their way through burrows, tunnels, and other underground lairs. They can sense depth and direction underground much as gnomes do. Melee combat within the confines of a small burrow should normally entail a -1 or -2 penalty to attack rolls, to which burrow bandits are immune because of their ability to fight in this manner. AL: Any.

Carrasquito: This lupin breed gained its name from its native land, El Grande Carrascal, a cactus wasteland near the lspan Baronies. The tiny carrasquito developed the natural ability to move easily through overareas (as a 3rd-ledruid). The carrasquito also causes gnolls and humanoids of equal or greater size to attack it with a –4 penalty to hit, due to the lupin’s small size. Despite its relatively high intelligence, however, the carrasquito sometimes shows excessive bravery for its physical size and requires a Wisdom check to braway from a fight willingly. AL: Lawful or Neutral.

Chow-chow, : Ochalean ogre-magi had originally bred the chow-chow lupins as slave hunters, but also for their thick, red fur and their flesh. With help from foo-dogs and clans of friendly lupins (shar-pei mercenaries and Ochalean crested) ogrish chow-chow rebelled and gained their freedom. As a result, chow-chow do not take kindly to slavers, especially ogre-magi. Chow-chow have a 50% chance (plus their level) of recognizing polymorphed creatures, or 90% for ogre-magi. Furthermore, they benefit from a +1 bonus to initiative in combat due to their ferocity. AL: Any.

Cimarron Hairless: Also known by shadow elves as Xoloitzcuintli, this ancient, dark-skinned breed relates to the original followers of Atzanteotl. They were notorious for being sacred guardians of Atzanteotl’s inner temples. After the Immortal had betrayed and abandoned them and their shadow elven masters, most of these lupins resettled northwest of the Broken Lands. Some however did remain with the shadow elves since. Because of their inherent vulnerability to sunrays, they often wear garments covering their faces and entire body. Like shadow elves, they have 90’ infravision and they are immune to paralysis from ghouls and other undead. They can also spot secret doors and other details with a 1-2 score on 1d6. AL: Any.

Das Hund: This short-legged but long-bodied critter has become an adroit rogue, excelling as a thief or spy. Several have gained enough notoriety within noble circles of the Savage Coast that several different rulers actually compete to acquire their services, including the Heldannic Order. Das Hund, with a successful Wisdom check, can guess someone’s next immediate course of action provided it can stare into the other person’s eyes for at least a round. The DM must limit such information to six words or less. AL: Any.

Doggerman: This black-and-rust Hattian breed originally specialized in guarding palaces and military barracks. It can often be found working as a career soldier, an officer, a professional bodyguard, or in a secret police caste. Many found permanent employment with Thyatis’s Hattian legions and the Heldannic Order. Its natural senses are not as keen as those of hunting breeds for example; however, it has sharp memory, observation, and deduction skills (+2 bonus to Intelligence checks in this regard). The doggerman also benefits from a free intimidation proficiency. This Strength-based talent allows the doggerman to force NPCs into submission. The doggerman does receive a penalty to this check equal to a third of the NPC’s experience level (or HD), rounded down. AL: Lawful.

Fennec, Fighting-: This tiny, sand-color critter is about the size of the carrasquito. It looks like a miniature fox with very large ears. A native of Ylaruam, the fighting-fennec relates to nocturnal hunting clans living from small desert prey and furtive raids on human caravans. Nomadic Alaysians know the fennec is a follower of Al-Kalim and respect it for that. Most importantly, a fennec joining a party is believed to be a good omen, a sign of goodwill from Al-Kalim. This is because the fennec is a lucky fellow with the ability, once per day, to reroll anyone’s single die, including a foe’s or a friend’s. Very keen of hearing, it can Hear Noise with a 40% base chance + 2 per experience level (in addition to any normal thief abilities). AL: Lawful or Neutral.

Foxfolk: This reddish lupin, as can be expected, is perfectly at ease among woodland beings. Unlike to other hunting breeds, a foxfolk cannot be a cleric, however, it can attain unlimited druidic level. A Norwold cousin exists, with white fur, but otherwise no game difference. A foxfolk benefits from an innate ability to smell a trap this is a danger sense alerting it of an impending danger (the DM must score a 1-2 on 1d6 for the ability to be activated). The foxfolk, however, knows neither where the trap lies nor its nature, just that danger lurks nearby (a mechanical trap, a hidden pit, a magical snare, or even a foe waiting in ambush). AL: Chaotic, usually good.

Glantri Mountaineer: Where else but in the Glantrian Alps could this placid lupin feel best at home? Sturdy, slobbery, but loveable, this benevolent character knows every corner of its native mountain, even in the worst blizzard. This lupin has free mountaineering, orienteering, and yodeling proficiencies. It also has the ability to lay on hands, healing 1 hp/level. AL: Lawful or Neutral.

Gnomish Snoutzer: Just as gnomes pride their nasal appendages, so do the schnauzers their snouts. Their sense of smell is so good they can accurately predict natural weather for up to 6 hours in advance (wind speed & direction, temperature, and precipitation). These workers became good friends with forest gnomes. In exchange for benefiting from the snoutzers’ natural abilities, these gnomes taught them how to pass through wooden terrain without leaving a visible trace and how to become invisible in woods when motionless (80% chance of succeeding either attempts). AL: Lawful or Neutral.

Golden Retriever, Greater: This lupin relates to an ancient hunting breed that became very skillful with archery and, as the name implies, at retrieving its quarry from whence it fell. As a result, the golden retriever benefits from a +1 bonus to hit with bows and slings (non-mechanical weapons). Its peculiar background gave the retriever an unusual trait, however. Any time a hand-held object is thrown at or away from the retriever, it must succeed a Wisdom check to avoid running after the object (unless consequences involve obvious death). The DM may assign bonuses to the Wisdom check, as dictated by the situation. When failing a Wisdom check, the retriever can temporarily increase its Dexterity for the next two rounds. It does so in the following way: subtract half the retrievers present Dexterity score from 10; add the result rounded up to the retrievers Dexterity score. Despite this unusual trait, some retrievers have been able to become paladins because of their benevolent demeanor. AL: Lawful.

Heldann Shepherd: The original clans of this proud and versatile lupin breed relied on their talent as sheep and goat herders. Over the centuries, this lupin has expanded its fields of knowledge commonly to include the duties of constable, soldier, guide, and guard. Because of its versatility, the Heldann shepherd starts with an additional two non-weapon proficiencies, plus one more every time new proficiencies are normally acquired. Furthermore, the Heldann shepherd gains a +1 bonus to its initiative rolls. AL: Lawful.

Hound of Klantyre: This small lupin is an archetypical vermin hunter. When launched against rat-sized creatures with no particular defenses or magic except their great numbers, the “scottie” can make an additional attack per experience level (short sword or smaller hand-held weapon only). Furthermore, because of its origins, the hound of Klantyre has a particular understanding of undeath. When confronted with undead creatures, this lupin has either an innate protection from evil or, if a cleric, the ability to turn undead as if two experience levels higher. Klantyre and Boldavian nobility, notorious Glantrian undead, generally treat hounds of Klantyre with suspicion at best, unless the latter unequivocally demonstrate their will to serve them. Some have become powerful minions of these undead, others skillful undead hunters. Hounds of Klantyre can recognize the smell of undeath (i.e., its type) as they would a common race. AL: Any.

Ispan Pistolero: This small, drooping-eared lupin relates especially to Ispan woodcock-hunting clans. Most of their clans migrated to the Ispan lands where they managed to acquire unusual respect for their kind from the human population. In so doing they developed a sinattraction to firearms aon the Savage Coast, which earned them their present name lspan gundogs. They can use firearms, from pistols to arquebuses, with a +1 bonus to their initiative and attack rolls. They also have a free gunsmith proficiency. AL: Any.

Long-Runner: This tall and skilupin draws its notoriety from the ability to run fast and far. Its origins go back to nomadicclans that roamed the vast steppes, peddling their goods from one settlement to another. As a result, the long-runner gains free endurance and appraisal proficiencies. As far as the long-runner’s ability to run or move quickly over long distances are concerned, its Constitution score should be modified in the same way the golden retriever’s Dexterity is altered (see earlier entry). The long-runner has the natural propensity to run after small prey suddenly darting away (unless consequences involve obvious death). A successful Wisdom check can prevent this from happening. The chase lasts 1d6+2 rounds or until the prey is captured. AL: Any

Maremma, Narvaezan: Dubbed the Serene Master of All He Surveys, this tall, snow-white lupin is as brave as it is amiable. It draws its origins from sheep-raising clans whose members were praised for their guarding and fighting skills. As such, the Maremma stands as one of the very few lupins that can become a paladin. The maremma can be surprised only on a roll of 1 on a d6. Furthermore, this lupin’s visual senses allow it to notice details that could give-away the presence of hidden foes with a successful Wisdom check (footprints on the ground, grass and shrubs disturbed, a branch bending unnaturally, an abnormal rustle of leaves, an odd shadow, a sudden movement in a crowd, someone staring, etc). AL: Lawful.

Mastiff, King: Generally of great strength and dignity, this lupin can be a most formidable guardian. The king-mastiff generally devotes its life to a master or to a cause. As a result, the mastiffs determination in combat remains unequaled among lupins. Anytime it suffers damage of any type that is a third or more of its current hit point total, half of this damage (rounded down) counts as stun damage only. The mastiff passes out when it reaches zero hit points due to combined stun and physical damage, and dies if it reaches -10 hit points. If not slain, the mastiff wakes up 1d6+4 rounds later (minus its Constitution bonus to hit points), shrugging off all accumulated stun damage. Furthermore, the mastiff is immune to natural or magical fear. AL: Any.

Nithian Rambler: One could be tempted to think that Pflarr’s blood flows through the hearts of these Pharaoh hounds than in any other lupin breed, but in truth they only preserved through the centuries a spiritual and cultural affinity with ancient Nithia. Nithian ramblers desperately cling to shreds of their ancient ways and to a devotion to Pflarr (or Thanatos), as if to atone for (or avenge) the loss of their true bloodlines. Nithian ramblers either do not reveal their background or remain in secluded communities, away from other lupins. Clerics of Pflarr are sometimes involved in breeding schemes planned out over centuries, to try to purify their bloodlines and bring back a true Hutaakan whom they would revere as some sort of envoy from Pflarr, possibly a prophet. Clerics of Thanatos would instead try to eliminate such a creature. When succeeding a Wisdom check with a –2 penalty, a Nithian rambler can smell whether another lupin has any trace of Hutaakan blood. AL: Any.

Norwold Malamute: This northerner is accustomed to roam the icy reaches of Norwold. It has free running and orienteering proficiencies the latter of which it developed to an unparalleled degree. The Norwold malamute naturally knows its way through the dark, polar rim leading to Mystara’s Hollow World. Early on, malamute clans learned to follow migratory paths across the frozen Nentsun Channel and the Hyborean Ice Pack. Fast and tireless, an unencumbered malamute can move across snow at a normal speed; it also saves against all cold-based attacks with a +2 bonus. AL: Any.

Ochalean Crested: Almost entirely hairless, this small lupin has a dark brown to black skin, with a long tuft of white hair flowing from the top of its head to its shoulders. Long white hair also grows on its feet, the back of its hands, and the end of its tail. It often occupies positions of authority (mandarins, magistrates, governors, or Ochalean nobility) or those associated with erudites (sages, wizards, scribes, etc). Magic generally fascinates Ochalean crested lupins, much like it does with elves. They developed a natural ability allowing them, once a day, to switch one memorized spell for another of a lower level, duplicated from among other memorized spells. In other words, the lupin can decide to forfeit its fireball spell, and duplicate another lesser spell already memorized, like a feather fall. AL: Any.

Ochalean Houndling: Thanks to their wrinkled faces, pushed-in noses, and undershooting jaws, these Beitungese are thought truly ugly by human standards. Nevertheless these tiny lupins evolved to become the most common lupin breed in Ochalea’s capital city. They are the workers, merchants, shopkeepers, servants, artists, and everyday folk one could expect to find in the streets, had Ochalea been a lupin setting. Numerous houndlings live at the palace in Beitung either as servants or as courtesans. The houndling has the unique talent of eluding trouble when adopting a meek and submissive countenance. Whenever two people face any kind of trouble (anger from an important person, a foe in combat, etc.) this Beitungese may beg and kowtow, prompting the source of the trouble to ignore the houndling and focus its attention on the other fellow instead. For this, the houndling need only succeed a Wisdom check and move away from the source of trouble at MV 30 until completely out of its sight. Houndlings have a free etiquette proficiency. AL: Any.

Papillon, Neo-: Despite its large, hairy ears, this lupin learned to use its small size to its own profit, namely that of being an escape artist. It can slip out of non-magical bonds with a successful Dexterity check (-5 penalty if magical). It can also squeeze through very small spaces to escape a prison, bending past tight corners in the process. The escape route can measure as little as a foot in diameter for a neo-papillon to crawl through (MV 3). As a thief it also has a +15% modifier to its chances to Open Locks. The most famous of these lupins, a Renardois called Papillon, was wrongfully deported to the penitentiary in the Fortress of Boa Vista, far away at the tip of The Horn. It has escaped several times in the past 20 years, only to be recaptured in the swamps and deserts of this desolate peninsula. AL: Any Neutral or Chaotic.

Pit-Bull, Torrean: This breed early on made it a specialty to fight in Thyatian arenas as professional gladiators. A few individuals earned their modern breed name after becoming illustrious toreadors in the bull-fighting arenas of Torrean (+1 bonus to attack rolls against all bull-like creatures, including minotaurs). These pit-bulls are excessively aggressive, proud, impatient, and unpredictable by nature. Other than professional arena fighters, pit-bulls unfortunately often end up as hired-hands, thugs, and other shady characters. These lupins are so ferocious that they behave as berserkers when involved in combat (either a +2 to attack rolls or an extra attack per round, and immunity to fear). Furthermore, a pit-bull requires a successful Wisdom check to break from combat once it has started. Recent rumor has it that pit-bulls have strong gnollish bloodlines, but there is no proof of such. AL: Chaotic, sometimes with good tendencies.

Renardois Folk: Typical hunters, Renardois folk appear as medium sized lupins, with short brown, black, and white fur. The most common lupin breed in Renardy, they naturally gather in groups of 4-10 at any opportunity, a strange habit going back to the times they roamed the steppes in great hunting packs. They sit by, quipping about passersby, whistling at ladies, and otherwise acting a tad obnoxious, if generally . Renardois folk make the bestlupin swashbucklers. They excel at causing others to enrage, which earned them a free taunting proficiency. With a successful Wisdom check, this proficiency causes a victim to become outraged for 1d4+2 rounds. An outraged victim’s Wisdomand Dexterity scores are temporarily halved (round up) and the victim must then succeed its own Wisdom check to avoidimmediately charging into combat. AL: Chaotic, usually good.

Shag-Head: This bob-tailed lupin earned this affectionate nickname because of its big and hairy appearance. If one could see its eyes, their gaze would betray unfathomable intensity and spiritual depth. The nickname also comes from this lupin’s propensity to wander the trails of Mystara disheveled and somewhat confused, in search of Immortal Truth. Shag-heads often per- form the functions of soothsayers or mystics due to their ability to sense emanations from beyond. This ability is not under the shag-head’s control (it is a DM’s tool only). The shag-head can sense events happening elsewhere (the death of an important person or someone of significant relation to the party, the crowning of a monarch, a battle, a storm, a building collapsing, a sinking ship, the anger of an Immortal, the awakening or birth of a creature of great good or evil, an approaching peril, etc.) at least once per adventure. While uttering auguries, which takes 1d4+2 rounds, a shag-head enters into uncontrolled trances during which it levitates and an aura of light surrounds its body. The light renders the lupin totally immaterial albeit still visible (then existing partially in the ethereal plane) and cures any of its wounds. The shag-head can suppress the urge to enter into trances with a successful Wisdom check, which delays the prophecy as follows (roll 1d4): 1 - a round, 2 - a turn, 3 - an hour, 4 - a full day. Such omens, either specific to the adventure or totally unrelated, should remain fairly obscure but solvable with some clues. The shag-head can remember what was said with a successful Wisdom check. Shag-heads are a perfect outlet for powerful entities to communicate with the rest of the party. Shag-heads also have any two of the following proficiencies free and with a +1 bonus: Honor (choose one Immortal), astrology, ancient languages. AL: Lawful.

Shar-Pei, High: Another illustrious lupin from Ochalea, this one is most famous as a warrior and a mercenary, which has been an ancient tradition with high shar-pei clans. Some under-employed mercenary clans also gained notoriety by resorting to piracy on land and at sea. They excel with pole-arms, for which they have a natural +1 bonus to their attack rolls. Because of their superior combat techniques with pole-arms, Shar-Pei warriors can forfeit all their attacks in a given round to try to keep multiple foes at bay. For this effect compare the Shar-Pei’s attack roll to its THAC0, the difference indicating the number of subsequent melee attack automatically missing. For example, if a Shar-Pei warrior with a THAC0 of 14 rolled an 18, the next 4 melee attacks would automatically miss, regardless of the attackers’ scores. If an attacker’s score was naturally insufficient to hit a Shar-Pei (for reasons other than the defensive pole-arm tactics), the attacker would also suffer a point of damage (plus Strength and magical adjustments). AL: Any.

Slagovici Conic: Pronounced “Slagovitchi gonitch,” also known as the Slagovich Goat Herder, this large and powerful lupin cannot be mistaken for any other because of its very long white coat falling in thick, felt-like cords resembling a string mop. Several clans of these lupins live in the hills around Slagovich, mostly raising goats. Naturally suspicious of strangers, they also have an 80% chance of detecting evil intent toward them, their immediate party, or their flock; they cannot, however, pinpoint its location or its nature. These lupins have free appraisal, animal handling, and animal lore proficiencies, although all three remain strictly limited to goats and sheep. AL: Chaotic.

Wolvenfolk: These hardy creatures have an innate tie to Saimpt-Loup, the Immortal of death, mercy, and survival of the fittest. Contrary to natural lupin evolution, Saimpt-Loup created original wolvenfolk bloodlines. It gives them the ability to sometimes conjure death itself. Whenever they meet an untimely death (poison, magic, 0 hit points, etc) wolvenfolk can make a Constitution check. If they succeed, they lose two experience levels and a point of Constitution, but awaken 1d4+2 rounds later with one hit point left instead. Furthermore, the wolvenfolk’s alignment moves one notch closer to Saimpt-Loup’s (Chaotic). Once a wolvenfolk reaches this alignment future use of the ability is forever negated. As a result of their special bond with Saimpt-Loup, wolvenfolk can neither be raised from the dead, nor have any other bloodline (see Tables 5 and 6). They can become mongrels after successive generations, at which point the magical bond with Saimpt-Loup is broken. Other breeds, however, could eventually gain wolvenfolk bloodlines but would then fall under the powerful Immortal bond as well They have a special affinity for the necromantic arts. AL: Any.

Ye Great Dogge: Locally known as the Ostland Stavare this huge lupin is an ancient and proud warrior among lupinkind. Its origins relate more to a hunter of large predators and a gentle giant. It often surfaced in lupin history as the breed of local heroes. Once a day and for six rounds, the great dogge can radiate a 25’ radius aura of inspiration comparable to a bless spell. The great dogge has a free leadership proficiency. This Wisdom-based skill allows the great dogge to remove fear (one attempt per person, singly or in a group). AL: Lawful.

Zvornikski Sentinel: The Zvornikian sentinel is a short-hair and all-white lupin with black dots. A branch of this clan is famous for staffing the fire squad in Zvornik. They prevented a major disaster in the capital, directing a desperate effort to stop a raging fire from engulfing the entire city. Of their clan of 20, four died in the disaster, but the city was saved. Their entire clan was knighted and earned the hereditary charge to control the Order of the Ember (a brotherhood of knights comparable to real-world Hospitaliers). They also have a permanent +2 bonus to saving throws against all fire-based attacks, natural or magical, +3 if a knight of the order. Sentinels can also smell fires larger than common campfires with a +2 bonus to the attempt (+5 bonus for a blaze; 1 penalty per mile away). AL: Any non-Chaotic.

 

Table 1: Racial modifiers and other statistics

 

Statistics

 

 

 

 

 

NPC Generator

(Roll two d20’s

Breed

S

D

C

I

W

CH

Height

Weight

MV

Bite

Senses

Known World

Savage Coast

Guardian (min. 12 Strength, max. 16 Intelligence

1-3

1-3

Doggerman

+1

-

-

-1

-

-

57”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.38

120’

1d6+1

Med.

1-6

1-2

Maremma

+1

-1

-

-1

-

+1

57”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.35

120’

1d6

Med.

7

3-8

Mastiff

+2

-1

+1

-1

-1

-

62”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.28

120’

1d6+2

Low

8-11

7-10

Pit-Bull

+1

+1

+1

-

-2

-2

52”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.38

120’

1d8

Low

12-13

11-14

Shar-Pei

+1

-

+1

-

-

-2

54”+ Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.35

120’

1d6+1

Low

14-16

-

Wolvenfolk

+1

-

+2

-1

-1

-1

58”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.32

120’

1d6+1

Med.

17

15-17

Ye Great Dogge

+2

-1

-1

-

-

+1

66”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.3

150’

2d4

Med.

18-20

18-20

 

Hunters (min 12. Intelligence, max 16. Strength

4-6

4-5

Basset Hound

-1

-

+1

-

-

-

46”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.4

90’

1d4+1

High

1-3

1-2

Beagle

-1

-

-

+1

-

-

47”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.4

90’

1d4+1

High

4-7

3

Bloodhound

-

-2

+2

-

-

-

55”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.35

90’

1d6+1

High

8-9

4-7

Chow Chow

-

-1

+1

-

-

-

51”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.38

120’

1d6

High

10-13

-

Foxfolk

-1

+2

-2

-

+1

+1

47”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.42

120’

1d4+1

High

14

8-10

Golden Retriever

-

+1

-

-

-2

+1

56”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.38

120’

1d6

High

15-17

11-12

Ispan Pistolero

-

-

-1

+1

-

-

48”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.4

90’

1d4+1

High

-

13-15

Nithian Rambler

-2

+1

-2

+1

+2

-

56”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.45

150’

D4+1

High

18-20

16

Renardois Folk

-

+1

-

-

-1

-

55”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.38

120’

1d6

High

-

17-20

 

Shepherds (min. 12 Wisdom, max. 16 Strength)

7-8

6-8

Heldann Shepherd

-

-

-

-

-

-

57”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.38

120’

1d6

Med.

1-12

1-3

Shag-Head

-

-1

-

-

+1

-

54”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.38

120’

1d6

Med.

13-19

4-9

Slagovich Herder

+1

+1

-

-2

-

-

58”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.35

120’

1d6

Med.

20

10-20

 

Workers (min. 12 Constitution, max. 16 Intelligence)

7-8

6-8

Eusdrian Bulldog

+1

-

-

-

-

-1

55”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.3

90’

1d4+1

Low

1

1-7

Glantri Mountaineer

+2

-1

-

-

-

-

57”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.3

90’

1d6+1

High

2-8

-

Gnomish Snoutzer

-2

+1

-

-

+1

-

50”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.4

120’

1d4+1

High

9-15

8-13

Norwald Malamute

-

-

+2

-1

-1

-

56”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.38

120’

1d6+1

Med.

16-19

-

Zvomikian Sentinel

-1

-

-

-1

+1

+1

55”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.38

150’

1d6

Med.

20

14-20

 

Vermin Hunters (max. 12 Strength and 19 Dexterity)

12-13

11

Blue Bandit

-

-

-

-

-2

+1

56”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.4

120’

1d4+1

Med.

1-4

1-6

Burrow Bandit

-

+1

+1

-

-2

-

53”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.4

60’

1d4+1

Med.

5-12

7-16

Das Hund

-

+2

-2

-

-

-

47”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.4

60’

1d4

Med.

13-16

17-20

Fennec

-2

+2

-

-

-

-

31”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.42

60’

1d2

Med.

17-18

-

Hound of Klantyre

-

-

-1

-

+1

-

45”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.4

60’

1d4

Med.

19-20

-

 

Wee Folk (min. 12 Intelligence, max. 10 Strength)

14

12-13

Bouchon

-

-1

-

-

-

+1

47”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.4

90’

1d2

Low

1-5

1-7

Carrasquito

-

+2

-2

-

-

-

31”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.4

60’

1

Low

6

8-14

Cimmaron Hairless

-

-

-1

+2

-

-1

50”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.4

90’

1d2+1

Low

7-9

15-16

Ochalean Houndling

-

-

-

-

+2

-2

37”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.4

60’

1d2

Low

10-13

-

Ochalean Crested

-

-

-1

+2

-

-1

47”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.4

90’

1d2

Low

10-13

-

Papillon

-

+2

-1

-

-1

-

47”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.4

90’

1d2

Low

18-20

17-20

 

Nomads (min 12 Dexterity, max 16 Strength)

15

14-15

Borzoi

-

-1

-

-

-

+1

47”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.45

180’

1d4

Med.

1-10

1-10

Long-Runner

-

-1

-

-

-

+1

47”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.45

180’

1d4

Med.

11-20

11-20

 

Mongrels (min 8 Strength for basic lupins)

16-20

16-20

Random Breeds

*

*

*

*

*

*

64”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.33

120’

1d6

Med.

Roll NPCs individually

Basic Lupin

+1

-

+1

-1

-1

-

64”+Strength

(SizexStrength)/0.33

120’

1d6

High

-

-

 

Ability Adjustments for random mongrel breeds:

Roll 1d20 for each statistic. A roll of 1 indicates a –2 adjustment for the ability. A roll of 2-5 indicates a –1 adjustment. A roll of 16-19 indicates a +1 adjustment. A roll of 20 indicates a +2 adjustment the total of all the adjustments is +1 or more, the mongrel is afflicted with a short lifespan (-10 years per plus). If the total of the adjustments is –1 or below, the mongrel has high senses. Specific racial adjustments and other features have only a 25% chance of being passed on to the progeny (roll 1d% - 1-25 father’s, 26-50 mothers, 51-100 random.

 

Table 2: Lupin senses

Ability and Description (High Senses)

Infravision: 60’

Detect Werewolf: 99% chance

Detect Invisible and Ethereal Beings: +4 bonus

Blindfighting: Free skill

Tracking: At ½ Wisdom score (+6 if possessing the Tracking skill).

Recognize Smell: Automatic success to recognize a race. To recognize an individual person, Intelligence check.

Detect Noise: 35% chance +2%/level1

Special Weakness: -2 penalty to saving throws vs. odor- or sound-based attacks.

1- add to Hear Noise chance if a thief

Medium Senses

60’

83%

+2

 

Free skill

At 1/3 Wisdom (+3 if possessing the Tracking skill)

Race, Intelligence at +2

For a person, -2

 

30% + 1%/level

-1 penalty

Low Senses

30’

66%

+1

 

-

At ¼ Wisdom (+1 with skill).

Race. Intelligence

Person, -4

 

25%

-

 

Table 3: Class limitations 

 

Fighter

Holy Warrior

Knight

Magic-user

Cleric

Druid

Thief

Bard

Guardians

Hunters

Shepherds

Workers

Vermin H.

Wee Folk

Nomads

Mongrels

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

A

D

I

F

I

-

I

-

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

B

+

+

-

+

+

+

+

+

E

+

+

+

H

+

+

+

+

+

G

+

+

+

+

C

-

-

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

 

  1. Maremma (paladins) and Wolvenfolk (avengers) only
  2. Wolvenfolk only
  3. Pit-Bull only
  4. Golden Retriever only
  5. No Foxfolk allowed
  6. Zvornikian Sentinel only
  7. Norwald Malamute only
  8. Carrasquito only
  9. Druidic Knight only (among workers, only Glantrian Mountaineer and Norwold Malamute)
  10. Holy Fighter - Avenger, Defender, Druidic Knight, Paladin

 

Table 4: Random lupin lineage

A 5d10 roll indicates the lineage of a lupin (if any at all) and the strength of this heritage, as shown below. Remember that the strength of a lupin’s lineage has no bearing on its breed or physical appearance.

 

Roll 5d10

4-5 tens

3 tens

2 tens

4-5 nines

3 nines

2 nines

4-5 eights

3 eights

2 eights

2 ones

3 ones

4-5 ones

Ancient Lineage

Strong Hutaakan bloodline

Weak Hutaakan lineage

Faint traces of Hutaakan blood

Strong foo-dog bloodline

Weak foo-dog lineage

Faint traces of foo-dog blood

Strong blink dog bloodline

Weak blink dog lineage

Faint traces of blink dog blood

Faint traces of gnollish blood

Weak gnollish lineage

Strong gnollish bloodline

 

It s possible to have mixed heritage (rolling 2 or 3 tens and 2 ones for example). Rolling anything other than tens, nines, eights or ones indicates a total lack of a clear bloodline, other than the lupin’s own breed.

Lineage is generally hereditary (it stays in a family) but can be strengthened or weakened through successive generations. If either of the parents has no clear lineage at all, then roll 5d10 on table 4 for each child. If both parents have at least a trace of a bloodline, roll 1d20 for each child. An odd result relates to the father’s lineage, aneven number to the mother’s. With a roll of 19-20, bloodline is strengthened by one category. On a roll of 7-18, lineage is passed on as is. On a roll of 1-6, lineage is weakened by one category. If ether parent had equal traces of two different bloodlines, then choose one at random (50%) as the one passed on to the child. Table 5 shows the effects of the stronger bloodlines. Faint traces of a bloodline have no effect. Effect of different bloodlines are cumulative; also, a lupin with a strong bloodline also gains the effects of the weak bloodline.

 

Table 5: Effects of bloodlines

 

Lineage

Strength

Effect

Hutaakan

(tens)

Strong

You are blessed by Pflaar for He now gazes upon you. You derive no supernatural powers from your heritage, only fame or a deadly hate if your secret were ever unveiled. Gain +1 Wisdom (max 19) regardless of original lupin breed.

Weak

Your heritage is strong enough to warrant a claim to ancient lupin nobility, should younveil your lineage. No special abilities.

 

Strong

The Grandee of Ochalea will honor the path on which you tread. May you live in interesting times! You age (no saving throw) unnaturally if failing to perform a good act; 1 year for merely ignoring an opportunity to do some good, 5 years if actually causing harm. The loss is permanent. You gain a +2 bonus to all saving throws (except vs. poison) and naturally radiate a protection from evil once per day (as the magic-user spell, cast at half the lupin’s level, rounded up).

Weak

Your basic lifespan is only 70 years, compared to 90 for most breeds. Your alignment must be Lawful, regardless of breed. You cannot be a thief.

 

Blink dog

(eights)

Strong

You can blink once per experience level, per day, with an 80% chance of success. Each blink tempweakens you; treat as a point of stun damage (see mastiff description above for stun mechanics). Failing an attempt to blink with a roll of “00” causes the permanent loss of a hit point

 

Weak

Your alignment must be Lawful, regardless of breed. Gain +2 to AC due to your innate dodging ability.

 

Gnollish

(ones)

Strong

Your ultimate fate now lies in the hands of Yeenoghu, a pawn of darkness (NPC only). Roll up a new character at once! Your alignment must now be Chaotic, regardless of original lupin breed.

Weak

Gain +1 Constitution (max. 19) and –2 Intelligence, regardless of racial minimums.

 

Lycanthropes

Wereseal, lesser, female

Experience Level

XP

HD

Special Abilities

AC

Cub

-12,000

1d8

I

7

Whelp

-9,000

2d8

II, III

7

Scamp

-6,000

3d8

IV, V

6

(NM)

0

4d8

VI, VII

5

1

12,000

5d8

-

 

2

36,000

6d8

-

 

3

84,000

-

VII

 

4

180,000

7d8

-

 

5

372,000

8d8

IX

 

6

672,000

9d8

-

 

7

972,000

-

X (Seal)

 

8

1,272,000

10d8

-

 

9*

1,572,000

+2 hp

Seal-

 

* +300,000 XPs per level thereafter

+2 hit points per level thereafter

Constitution bonus no longer applies

 

Wereseal, greater, male

Experience Level

XP

HD

Special Abilities

AC

Cub

-328,000

2d8

I

7

 

-322,000

3d8

 

 

Whelp

-310,000

4d8

II

7

 

-286,000

5d8

III

 

Scamp

-238,000

6d8

IV

6

 

-142,000

7d8

V

 

(NM)

0

8d8

VI, VII

5

1

284,000

9d8

-

 

2

584,000

10d8

-

 

3

884,000

-

VII

 

4

1,184,000

11d8

-

 

5

1,484,000

12d8

IX

 

6

1,784,000

13d8

-

 

7

2,084,000

-

X (Seal)

 

8

2,384,000

14d8

-

 

9*

2,684,000

+2 hp

Seal-Man

 

* +300,000 XPs per level thereafter

+2 hit points per level thereafter

Constitution bonus no longer applies

 

Wereseal, greater, female

Experience Level

XP

HD

Special Abilities

AC

Cub

-25,600

2d8

I

7

Whelp

-19,200

3d8+1

II, III

7

Scamp

-6,400

4d8+1

IV, V

6

(NM)

0

5d8+2

VI, VII

5

1

25,600

6d8+2

-

 

2

76,800

7d8+3

-

 

3

179,200

-

VII

 

4

384,000

8d8+3

-

 

5

680,000

9d8+4

IX

 

6

980,000

10d8+4

-

 

7

1,280,000

-

X (Seal)

 

8

1,580,000

11d8+5

-

 

9*

1,880,000

+2 hp

Seal-Man

 

* +300,000 XPs per level thereafter

+2 hit points per level thereafter

Constitution bonus no longer applies

 

Manscorpions

Manscorpions have a human torso and a bony-plated, arachnoid body with eight legs. Their spines stretch out to form a long tail with a wicked stinger on the end of it. Their hands have two thick fingers and a long thumb, giving them the appearance of a scorpion's claws. Though are usually bald.

Manscorpions, especially the Nimmurian sort, should remain NPCs under the DM's control. Here are the details of that NPC class, as it could be used in a campaign. Considering the number of hit dice of a normal manscorpion, it is easier to assume there are lesser manscorpions of 1-7 HD and greater manscorpions of 8 HD and up (spell-casting clerics). Using the standard fighter experience table, apply a 30% penalty to all earned experience for a standard manscorpion; the penalty should be only 20% for Nimmurian manscorpions because of Idu's curse. All manscorpions start with 1 HD, equal to a 1st-level human fighter, but manscorpion warriors have none of the human fighter's special abilities or Fighter Combat Options. Manscorpions always make their saving throws as fighters. Even when manscorpions reach 8 HD and become clerics, they continue to gain 1d8 hit points per hit die. They also retain all fighter weapon skills previously acquired (edged and piercing weapons are permitted).

A saving throw negates a lesser manscorpion's poison. If the save fails, the poison causes illness (Movement, Dexterity, and Strength are halved, rounded down; initiative -3). The effects of the poison begin 1d4 rounds after the sting, and last 4d6 hours. The sting itself inflicts 1d4 points of damage. The poison of a greater manscorpion is deadly. Its sting inflicts 1d10 points of damage, and the victim is paralyzed for 1d8-1 rounds. A failed saving throw vs. poison means instant death. If the DM allows a player to run this type of monster as a PC, the poison should be of the paralyzing type only (with a saving throw-vs. paralysis) for the sake of fairness to other players and game balance.

Manscorpions cannot rise beyond 13th level. If the DM allows unlimited levels, manscorpions should use 1d6 for determining hit points, from 8th level up. This should be decided before bringing such a character into play. Constitution bonuses are added when the NPC is created and every time it gains a new level, up to 9th level. Racial ability modifiers are given here:

 

Abilities

Race Max.

Manscorpion

STR

18

+1

INT

17

-1

WIS

17

-1

DEX

18

-

CON

18

+1

CHA

18*

-

 

* Charisma only applies between manscorpions; penalize Charisma by -2 when dealing with humanoids, -5 when dealing with demihumans or humans

 

Miscellaneous: A manscorpion can hold its breath as long as a normal human, but cannot swim at all. Water dissolves Nummurian make-up in 1d4 rounds. Manscorpions of Nimmur have infravision and a natural armor class of 7. Addition of body armor of AC 7 or worse only improves the manscorpion's natural armor class by one point. For body armor of AC 6 or better, use the rating of the armor worn, plus an armor-class bonus of one point. Shield and Dexterity modifiers to armor class work normally. Assume the normal monster's AC 1, as described in the Rules Cyclopedia, comes from armor and high Dexterity. Male manscorpions stand 60 + 2d6 inches tall and weigh 1,700 + 1d0x10 cn (decrease height by 2" and weight by 200 cn for females). They begin play at the age of 20 + 3d6 years and can reach the age of 80 + 2d20.

 

N'djatwa (elf-ogres)

To be a N’djatwa, one needs a Strength and Intelligence of 12 minimum. Hit points are rolled on eight-sided hit dice, according to the N’djatwa experience Advancement table. N’djatwa save as elves of the same level (young and teens save as E1). They have infravision and the ability to detect secret passages. They are not, however, immune to ghoul paralysis, nor can they climb trees. N’djatwa are Neutral or Chaotic, and they can cast magic-user spells. Neutral individuals with a Wisdom of 13 or more can cast druidic spells in lieu of magic-user spells (no clerical spells beyond the first level are allowed for these druids); this decision is irreversible and must be taken when the character is created. Typical adult statistics are as follows:

AC 5; HD 3*; MV 120’(40’); #AT 1 for weapon; Dmg 1d6 per fist or by weapon; #AP 1d12 (any); Save E3: ML 10; AL N or C; XP 115.

 

N'djatwa Experience Advancement

 

 

 

Experience

Spells per level

Level

Hit Dice

needed

1

2

3

4

Young

Teen

Adult

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

11+1

-4,800

-2,400

0

4,800

14,400

33,600

72,000

148,000

300,000

600,000

900,000

1,200,000

-

-

1

2

2

2

2

3

3

3

3

4

-

-

-

-

1

2

2

2

3

3

3

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

2

2

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

2

 

* +2 hit point per level thereafter; Constitution adjustments no longer apply. No other spells are gained beyond level 10

 

Phanatons

Phanatons are seldom-seen, intelligent forest dwellers that have very strong ties to nature. A phanaton looks like a cross between a raccoon, a monkey, and a flying squirrel. A phanaton is roughly the size of a halfling and has a 4-foot-long prehensile tail. In addition, a phanaton has membranes of skin stretching from arm to leg, which can be spto glide from branch to branch. A phanaton's coloration resembles that of a raccoon, with a dark mask over the eyes, gray-brown fur, and a ringed tail. The phanaton's hands are like a monkey's, possessing opposable thumbs. Phanaton eyes are bright green, fiery red, or shiny yellow.

These spiritual folk have a great love of nature. Though normally peaceful, they strive to protect their forest homes and can fight well when pressed. Phanatons lead a relatively harsh existence, so they tend to be rather serious. Still, they take joy from life; not jokers or boisterous carousers, they have a quiet sense of humor. Phanatons are cautious and not prone to panic, nor are they easily awed by shows of power. Phantons tend to be Lawful.

Phanatons have a complex language that consists largely of hoots, chatters, aclicks. Some phanatons can also speak the languages of elves and treants. Each tribe is made up of clans which have 3d10+10 adult members and 25% of that number of offspring. Their villages are built high in the trees on platforms of wood and woven vines connected by a network of rope bridges. The rope bridges are not suitable for man-sized or larger creatures. Any such creature attempting to use a phanaton bridge is likely to either fall off or break the bridge. Though they do not have a written language, phanatons continue to pass down most of their legends orally. Many phanaton names are followed by a list of accomplishments by their ancestors, such as "Falling Leaf, Whose Grandfather Longflier Dropped a Rotten Egg on the Head of an Evil Herathian Mage During the Battle of Two-Burnt-Sticks". Phanatons ally with most treants and dryads and are usually friendly with elves. Phanatons do not like humanoids that attempt to cut down forests. They try to halt timber efforts by secretly sabotaging equipment and playing annoying, nonlethal tricks on the woodcut. Healthy woods and jungles are often the sign of phanaton influence. They enjoy tending the woods, cultivating plants, and ensuring that the balance of nature in their area is maintained. Phanatons are omnivorous. They prefer to eat fruits and vegetables, but they also eat meat. They find spiders especially delicious.

Phanaton litters contain 1d6 kits that grow to maturity in about six months. Luckily, they are fertile for only a small fraction of the year. Otherwise, with their long life spans, quick maturity, and large litter sizes, they would quickly outbreed most other intelligent species.

As an option, phanatons could be run as player characters (or NPCs with levels). Here is a way they could be added to your game. It is suggested that PCs’ game statistics be rolled with the standard 3d6 dice method.

Gliding: Phanatons can glide, usually from branch to branch, due to loose skin between its limbs. The distance a phanaton can glide is equal to three times the starting height. So, for example, if a phanaton jumped from a height of 30’, it could glide over a horizontal distance of 90’ maximum at the rate of 50’/round). When gliding, a phanaton must spread its arms and legs to catch the air, and therefore cannot fight, cast spells, or do anything requiring two hands. For every 100 cn of weight they carry, phanatons reduce their horizontal gliding range by 20’ for the same loss of altitude as an unencumbered phanaton.

Flying: At 4th level, phanatons can fly - that is, maintain level flight or gain altitude, but only if updrafts or normal winds are present. The phanaton can gain 10’ of altitude for every 60’ of horizontal distance covered with normal winds (see the Rules Cyclopedia, page 90). A strong breeze will reduce the horizontal distance to 30’. Phanatons do not fly in high or extreme winds.

Pass plant: Phanatons gain the magical ability to pass plant, as per the druids fifth-level spell. They can use this ability once per day.

Shamans: Also called the “wise-ones,” they are chosen at birth and begin learning the way of the shaman from a very young age. They are entrusted with the knowledge of reading and writing. They can only cast spells from the druidic spell list (see the Rules Cyclopedia, page 33). Shamans should have both a Wisdom and Charisma of 12 or better. If the Wrath of the Immortals accessory is used, shamans of Ui gain the ability to move silently and hide in shadows as thieves of the same experience level so long as they remain in trees. Mother Earth's shamans gain the mystic’s ability to speak with animals. Shamans of the Huntsman receive the general skills of “Tracking” and “Alertness” plus any other general skills they might have. Jibarù shamans must use up one skill slot in order to read and write their own language. Common Jibarù don’t have that knowledge. Shamans must then choose language skills to speak treant, dryad, and elven (if any such creatures exist in the phanatons home), before any other skills. Non-shamans may acquire Jibarù writing skills, but with an initial penalty of - 3 to their Intelligence scores. Monarchs and other Jibarù leaders usually have that skill.

Miscellaneous: Phanatons are poor swimmers, preferring their arboreal habitat. Phanatons do not have infravision. The more common, primitive (nonsentient) breeds of phanatons are normally clumsy with their hands. When fighting, they are likely to drop objects (coconuts, branches) on their attackers, or bite them (1d6 points of damage), or use simple weapons (branches, stone maces, or other blunt objects). Phanatons of Jibarú have learned to use small spears, short bows, and blowguns with needles dipped in a paralyzing poison (save vs. poison or remain paralyzed for 1d6 turns). Shields and armor are rarely used since they negate the phanaton’s ability to glide. All phanatons are otherwise naturally agile (PC phanatons must have a Dexterity of 16 or better to qualify). Their natural AC is 9, with a +2 bonus to their AC and to all saving throws due to their small size and agility. Male phanatons are 32 + 2d8 inches tall and weigh 400 + 2d10x10 cn (decrease height by 2" and increase weight by 50 cn for females). Phanatons begin play at the age of 12 + 1d4 years and can reach the age of 80 + 3d10. Phanatons have the following racial modifiers to their game statistics:

 

Abilities

Race Max

Panatons

Medicine men

St

16

-2

-2

In

15

-1

-1

Wi

15

-

+1

Dx

18

+2

+1

Co

18

-

-

Ch

18*

-

-

* Natural Charisma applies only between phanatons, elves, treants, and dryads; otherwise, penalize Charisma - 1 when dealing with other humanoids, - 2 when dealing with humans and demihumans other than elves. Phanatons and araneas have a relative Charisma of 3 when dealing with each other.

 Names & language: Tapuru, Urua, Maragu, Araca, Ixaituba, Tuaca, Uapagu, Cacui, Jarapua, Gujari, Ixugu, Garanui, Axaua, Purucui, Palama, Tapaju, Uruxu, Itupaxingu, Macapui, Irigi. The Jibarú language does not have “e” and “o” sounds. The “x” is pronounced “sh,” and the last vowel in the name is accented. Double names are usually a sign of nobility, as shown for the two queens mentioned earlier in this article.

The spoken language is still primitive as far as grammar and syntax go, requiring many gestures. The written language otherwise requires an extensive library of symbols representing animalwhose sounds come close to the desired syllables. Ideograms conveying ideas complement other written symbols available to Jibarú shamans. The rest is left to the readers’ interpretations.

 

 

Phanatons

 

 

 

Special

Shamans

Spell Levels

Level

XP

HD

abilities

XP

1

2

3

4

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

0

1,800

3,600

7,200

14,400

28,800

56,600

112,200

225,000*

1d8-1

2d8-2

3d8-3

-

4d8-4

5d8-5

-

6d8-6

+2hp**

Glide

-

-

Fly

-

-

Pass Plant

-

-

0

3,000

6,000

12,000

24,000

48,000

96,000

200,000

400,000

-

1

2

2

2

2

2

3

3

-

-

-

1

2

2

2

2

3

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

2

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

 

* + 300,000 XP per level thereafter.

** +2 hit points per level; Constitution bonus no longer applies

 

Constitution bonus should be added only when the PC is created and every time it gains a new level, up to 8th level.

 

Rakasta

A rakasta looks like a furry human with the head of a cat. Its short fur is usually soft and ranges in color from light tan to brown (see table 4). Many rakastas have a darker hue on the ears and muzzle. Some specimens have white highlights at the ears and muzzle instead or even white or dark patches at the extremities (feet, hands, and tail). Older rakastas show a whitening around the face and ears. Rakastas have a build similar to that of humans; nomad rakastas tend to be slender, while those who live more sedentary lives tend to weigh more, ranging from slightly chubby to downright obese. The creatures have cat eyes, with vertical pupils. The irises are usually green, but some are yellow or even blue or hazel; a few rare individuals have two colors, most commonly one blue and one green eye.

Rakastan hands and feet are like those of humans, except for the fur and retractable claws. Rakastas also have nonprehensile tails. Nomads usually have tails between two and four feet long, though a very few have none at all. The tails of town dwellers range from four to six feet in length; most are covered with short fur, though the hair on some rare ones is long and silky. Rakastas are very proud of their tails and spend a great deal of time each day grooming them. The modern rakastan language is Rakastan, which has both ancient rakastan and Traladaran roots. In some ways, it sounds like Slag, but it is different enough that the similarities are more confusing than helpful. However, Slag is spoken by the town-dwelling nobility.

Though rakastas usually consider themselves superior to members of most other races, elves are considered almost equal. Humans, dwarves, and lupins receive a somewhat grudging respect; rakastas have occasional territorial disputes with the lupins. Settled rakastas view shazak lizard men as dangerous savages and believe other lizard kin to be even worse. Nomadic rakastas respect the warrior lifestyle of the shazaks, many of whom also adhere to the Warrior's Honor. However, caymen are considered irritating, and gator-men are viewed as nothing but dangerous opponents. Rakastas are very accepting of the peaceful tortles, who are well regarded warriors, clerics, and peasants in Bellayne. The rakastas hate goblinoids passionately. Rakastas form opinions on most other races on an individual basis.

Rakastas tend to be proud and emotional; the nomads, in particular, are quick to anger. All are convinced of rakastan superiority over other races. Still, most are extremely interested in the world at large. For the nomads, this translates into a wanderlust that demands they explore and experience all things for themselves, while for the town dwellers, it becomes an intense curiosity about visitors and a penchant for puzzles of any types.

Rakasta are created much as any other character, using the racial ability modifiers given in Table 1. Unless stated otherwise, racial minimums and maximums are 3 and 18. Size and weight are based largely upon the rakasta’s breed and Strength score. Should you decide to make female characters smaller, a -10% size difference is recommended for rakasta up to 70 inches tall, -20% for taller specimens. Weight requires more calculation but is also based upon size and Strength. Example: The male simbasta’s size is 73+Strength. A 16-Strength simbasta would then stand 89 inches tall. Its weight is (SizexStrength)/0.24. This means multiply the simbasta’s basic height in inches by its Strength score. Then divide the total by the indicated number. This simbasta should therefore weigh (73 x 16)/0.24 = 4860 cn. Note: The “basic rakasta” or “moggie” statistics are included here for comparison with other breeds. It is assumed the basic rakasta hero (from the Champions of the Princess Ark set) is but one of many alley rakasta. Should you decide to use this material, the basic rakasta should no longer be available. Instead, roll a “random” moggie.

Table 2 lists special abilities and weaknesses inherent to humanoid felines. Some apply only to certain categories of rakasta, while others affect all rakasta. Table 1 lists which rakasta are affected by which features. Table 3 lists the classes available to the various rakasta groups. Although rakasta cannot be multiclassed, they can be dual-classed following conventional game rules. Note that wild and greater rakasta can use only be wokans, not full magic-users. Tables 4 and 5 deal with appearances of domestic rakasta breeds and bloodlines.

 

Ability Adjustments for Alley Rakasta

Roll 1d20 for each statistic. A roll of 1 indicates a -2 adjustment for the ability. A roll of 2-5 indicates a -1 adjustment. A roll of 14-19 indicates a +1 adjustment. A roll of 20 indicates a +2 adjustment. If the total of all adjustments is +1 or more, the moggie has a high fear of water. If the total of all adjustments is -2 or worse, the moggie has no fear of water. Otherwise the moggie has a moderate fear of water. Specific racial adjustments and other features only have a 25% chance of being passed on to the moggie’s progeny (roll d%: 1-25 father’s, 26-50 mother’s, 51-00 random).

 

Special Abilities & Weaknesses

Rakasta have special abilities. Some may vary with their age, as listed below and in Table 2.

Roar: Most ancestors and greater rakasta have a roar powerful enough to affect their foes (see Table 1 for individual listing). The roar must be used in the first round of any combat encounter to be effective and counts as an action. Table 2 lists the effects of the roar.

Fear of Water: See Table 1 for each rakasta’s rating. Entering open water requires a successful Wisdom check, else halve the rakasta’s Strength and Dexterity ratings (rounded down) until out of the water. Halve Charisma as well until dry. Rakasta listed with None are immune to this limitation. Moderate fear requires a normal Wisdom check. High fear adds a +4 penalty to the check.

Feline Physiology: All rakasta except the basic rakasta can gather their strength and release it in a sudden burst of activity. When doing so, a rakasta may temporarily increase its Strength as follows: subtract half the rakasta’s normal Strength score from 10; add the result rounded up to the rakasta’s Strength. This burst of energy lasts a number of rounds equal to half the rakasta’s Constitution score (rounded down), or until the rakasta decides to calm down, whichever comes first. Each time this ability is used, the rakasta must rest for as many turns as the number of rounds the burst of energy lasted. Rakasta must sleep 12 hours each day in addition to these cat naps, although not necessarily at one time or during night hours. If a rakasta fails to complete either, its Strength, Dexterity, and Intelligence scores are all halved (rounded down) until properly rested. Felines normally rest 16 hours a day, but rakasta can limit their rest to 12 hours when adventuring. All rakasta are light sleepers. They can wake up at any suspicious sound, provided they make a successful detect noise roll. Add a 20% bonus for each subsequent sound. For example, a snoring companion does not affect a sleeping rakasta. A companion waking up and rummaging inside a backpack does. An approaching thief will too, unless the thief makes a successful Move Silently roll. Use common sense in adjudicating these situations.

Natural Concealment: Wild rakasta can conthemselves when hiding or moving slowly within their natural environment (see individual descriptions). Greater rakasta have the same ability, but all chances are halved. Table 2 lists the chances of success.

Catnip: Called nepeta rakastaria by some Known World sages, this plant of ancient Ochalean origins has a powerful effect on all Mystaran felines. Unless making a successful Wisdom check, the rakasta feels an uncontrollable and immediate urge to rub and roll on the plant, displaying a state of utter ecstasy (licking, biting, chewing, rubbing its cheeks and chin, shaking its head, purring, growling, leaping in the air). The victim never actually eats catnip but only enjoys its contact and smell. This display persists for as many rounds as the rakasta failed its Wisdom check, during which time it can make no action (attacks, spell casting, etc). If attacked at this time, the rakasta retains all magical, armor, and Dexterity bto AC, while the attacker sustains a -2 penalty to its attack rolls against this rakasta due to its unpredictable twists and rolls. There must be a fresh patch of at least a foot-square in order to affect a rakasta.

Whiskers: Part of all rakasta Dexterity comes from their vibrissae, which act as air-current detectors. Should these be damaged or cut off, the rakasta loses 2 points of Dexterity, and both the blind-fighting and detect invisible proficiencies. These whiskers regrow in 1d4 weeks.

 

Life Span

The basic life span of a rakasta is 90 years (maximum longevity is 90 + 2d8). Middle age for a rakasta comes at about half its base life span (45 years for a generic rakasta). Old age comes at two-thirds its base life span (or 60 years, minimum 40 years), and venerable age at its base life span (years, minimum 60 years). A middle-aged rakasta loses a point of Strength and Constitution, but gains a point of Intelligence and Wisdom. An old rakasta loses two points of Strength, Dexterity, and Constitution, but gains a point of Wisdom. A venerable rakasta loses a point of Strength, Dexterity, and Constitution, but gains a point of Intelligence and Wisdom.

 

Weapon & Armor Limitations

Rakasta have no limitations on what weapons they can use, other than class-related or campaign setting restrictions. Ancestors and great rakasta never use missile weapons other than hand-thrown weapons (stones, javelins, hand axes, etc). The former weapons are either too complex, out of character, or simply deemed cowardly. Hand-to-hand or unarmed bloodlust is more in their natural style. Some rakasta will not use any missile weapons at all due to their Warrior Honor. There are no further weapon limitations.

More lightly built rakasta stay away from heavy armor as a matter of racial preference. Rakasta listed with a weight divider of 4.6 or more (see Table 1) avoid armor whostandard encumbrance exceeds 250 cn. Rakasta with a weight divider of 4.1 or more avoid armor whose standard encumbrance exceeds 400 cn. Rakasta with a weight divider of 4 or less have no armor restrictions, other than those usually imposed by the chosen character class or the particular campaign setting. Increase the weight of armor for larger rakasta, as follows: For rakasta up to 70” tall, use the normal armor encumbrance. For every extra 4” size (or fraction thereof), add another 10% (retain fractions). For example, normal plate mail is listed at 500 cn. For each extra 4” size, add +10% (+50 cn). For an 80” tall rakasta, this armor should weigh 500 + (3 x 50) = 650 cn. Generally speaking, rakasta favor swiftness, maneuverability, and aggressive tactics over cautious or defensive approaches (such as heavy armor). Ancestors never wear armor other than hides and bones. Greater and wild rakasta do not normally manufacture metal armor of any sort, but they might wear it if made available to them.

 

Starting Hit Points

Rakasta can be awesome creatures. Making them available to play as heroes implies they all start as 1st-level characters with hit points corresponding to class. Although this is technically true, it would be better not to start some of them as 1st-level heroes. Ancestors and greater rakasta should never be created as anything less than 3rd-level PCs, and they should be used with a party of that level or better. Likewise, wild rakasta initially should be created at least as 2nd-level PCs. In general, rakasta should always start among the lowest level PCs in a party of varying experience levels. rakastas always begin with 2+1 HD, and must overcome a penalty of -2200 XP before beginning to gain experience. They have a -30% penalty on all experience earned.

 

Caracasta: These wild rakasta, originally natives of Davania’s Meghala Kimata plains, now live mostly in Hule. Many centuries ago they joined the expanding Milenian empire to defend themselves against other rival rakasta such as the simbasta, pardasta, and fast runners (q.v.). From the Milenians they adopted the use of bows and arrows. Their alliance to a human race and the use of a cowardly missile weapon made them pariahs, but all was fine until the Milenian empire collapsed. The caracasta lived on as a marginal people, hated and stalked by their greater cousins. Huleans showed up on Davania, much later, in a new attempt to colonize the area. After this attempt failed as had the one before, many of the caracasta who had allied with the invaders left with them and resettled in Hule. Caracasta aren’t uncommon in the ranks of the Hulean armies. As a reward for their services, the hagiarchy gave the caracasta conquered lands, mostly dry woodlands and scrub that human farmers had disdained. These rakasta are known in Hule as the Karakulak. Their short, dense fur is a uniform pale reddish-brown. Most have conspicuous, elongated tufts of black hair protrude at the tips of their large, pointy ears, which they twitch quickly when they are agitated. The caracasta use their ears to quietly exchange simple messages among each other, comparable to empathy. Under Hulean guidance, the Karakulak have learned to manufacture and use specially made arrows and composite short bows that exploit their natural energy bursts, maximizing short range fire. When non-spellcasting Karakulak fire their bows during an energy burst, they gain a +1 bonus to initiative and their arrows inflict an additional +1 damage, while the firing range becomes 70/120/180. Normal bow range otherwise remains 50/100/150. These weapons require a separate bow proficiency to use and are strictly limited to native Karakulak. Spellcasting caracasta cannot use the special bows regardless of class. They can, however, use the quick movement of their ears to cast spells of up to third level. This spellcasting technique requires two skill slots and can be used independently from the energy burst. AL: any non-lawful.

Cave Rakasta: These creatures of Mystara’s primeval past are direct descendants of Ba-steh, although their bloodlines are closer to Ba-steh’s shaman husband than to herself. They remain essentially primitive, oversized versions of the contemporary simbasta (q.v.). Their kind has long since been relinquished to the Hollow World. Despite their tremendous strength and ferocity, their primal ways have sealed their fate on the surface world. Unlike modern simbasta, the cave rakasta have a more powerful roar than the one described for greater rakasta when using its natural energy burst. This enhanced roar causes fear to all opponents within 100’ who fail a saving throw vs. paralysis. The fear lasts d6+1 rounds, during which victims drop any weapons at hand and attempt to escape in the opposite direction at maximum speed. AL: any non-chaotic.

Cloud Pardasta: Contrary to what their name seems to imply, these are not a greater rakasta. This wild felid type remains one of the best examples of arboreal rakasta, and somewhat of a legend as well. Cloud Pardasta live in the forests of Bellissaria and Skothar, along the Minaean Coast, Tangor Bay, and the Tangor Peninsula. On Skothar, they call themselves Rimau-Dahan - literally, fork-of-branch tigers. Cloud Pardasta gained their name from the large spots on their backs, which look like cloudy blotches. Theirbase coats varies from brown to pale or rich yellow, with white or light tawny on the inner limbs, throat, and chest. The odd name also comes from their unusual ability When using their energy burst, the cloud pardasta can harness natural magical forces pervading the forest and blend away into its mist, fog, or clouds. In effect, the cloud pardasta can cast dimension door to a distance of 10’ per experience level, at which point the energy burst ends. The cloud pardasta may invoke this power at any time while the energy burst still lasts. The cloud pardasta must be in contact with forest mist when they perform the dimension door. Cloud pardasta clans are tucked away in small villages built on the branches of very tall trees, virtually invisible from the ground. Cloud pardasta suffer no movement penalty when inside a tree. They have been observed by some hunters to sneak or run down tree trunks head first, without any difficulwhatsoever. They can hang from branches using only their legs, or run underneath one with ease. Jumping from one branch to another is a native game, which they do without requiring Dexterity checks or the use of an acrobatics check , unless the distance exceeds 15 feet horizontally or downward). Cloud pardasta have the acrobatics skill for free. To Accomplish these feats, the cloud pardasta’s long tail must be free to help balance movements. On the other hand, they lose two points of Dexterity when caught on the ground. AL: Lawful or Neutral.

Fast Runners: The fast runners dwell on the dry grasslands of the Meghala Kimata where they compete with Simbasta prides for food and freedom. Fast runners also survive in the southern Steps of Jen on Skothar and on the Isle of Dawn’s southern plateaus. The coat of a long runner is coarse, varying from yellowish-grey to golden or reddish-fawn with small dark spots. These tall, lanky rakasta often stun observers by their running speed and their agility when pursuing a prey. This alone makes them the most successful hunters among rakasta. This notoriety and the ensuing attention has been a curse to them for centuries. The life of the fast runners remains indeed a difficult one. On Davania, where they call themselves Msongo, they must beware of the Simbasta (q.v.) who view them as annoying pests. Elsewhere, Thothian monarchs and Jennite warlords who wish to bolster the ranks of their armies often seek their services, often with less than amicable terms. The rich and the powerful covet them as household hunters and status symbols. Unfortunately, the fast runners are too few truly to challenge these difficult neighbors. When using its natural energy burst, the Msongo can run at a much faster pace than other bipeds. The Msongo can triple its movement rate without any Strength check; quadruple it when succeeding a Strength check; quintuple it with a -4 penalty. Finally, with a -8 penalty, it can accelerate to six times its normal movement rate, but for one round only, after which the energy burst ends. No Constitution checks are otherwise required while the Msongo’s energy burst is lasting. AL: Lawful or Neutral

Jakar: This almost mythical creature hails from tropical rainforests and swamps on the Arm of the Immortal. Other indigenous races rarely venture deep into known jakar territory, so great is their fear of the powerful felidae, remaining instead within clear terrain and coastal areas. and Savage Coast explorers sailing from Vilaverde were the first easterners to encounter the jakar and call them the onna grande, or tall jaguar. The heavily muscled jakar sport beautiful spotted coats, usually tawny with large rosettes circling smaller spots, or entirely black, which helps them remain concealed within rainforests. Some unscrupulous Vilaverdans have begun a nefarious trade, capturing jakar either for their pelts or as monsters to be shown in circuses. This trade, naturally, is fraught with dangers, judging from the growing number of Vilaverdan hunting expeditions failing to return. The jakar normally live in small hunting clans, but on occasion high priests have risen from their ranks and founded more durable and advanced civilizations sweeping many of the small clans and uniting them. They often focused around powerful religious poles, with great pyramids, temples, palaces, and fortresses built to protect them. If any remain, these remain hidden at the heart of the rainforest. Many times in the history of the warlike jakar, these kingdoms abruptly vanished as a result of bloody conflicts, the omnipresent rainforest quickly reclaiming their lost cities. Rumors of untold treasures and secret ruins abound, which keeps the greedy coming. The jakar tolerate and respect the werejaguar, depending on prevailing alignments of the hunting clans, since they perceive it as a magical kin. Werejaguars, on the other hand, never show goodwill toward the jakar and might very well cause them harm if given an opportunity. Jakar have maintained a natural and mutual affinity with the common jaguar. Jakar have an empathic connection with the animal. During the feline’s natural energy burst, a 1st-level jakar’s claw and bite attacks are equivalent to +1 magical weapons. They don‘t actually give attack or damage bonuses, only the ability to strike certain magical beings. For every five additional experience levels, the jakar improves this ability (+2 equivalent at level 6, +3 at level 11, etc). AL: any.

Jakarundi: This is the oddest-looking rakasta, appearing as a cross between a weasel and a rakasta because of its long neck, pointy head, and slender body. Its clans are well established in the rainforests of the Arm of the Immortal, getting along fairly well with the jakar people (q.v.). The first Vilaverdan explorers encountered melanistic jakarundi, leading them to call these rakasta tigrete preto, literally “little black tiger” (or trigrillo negro for their neighboring customers). Their colors vary from black to brown, gray, red, or tawny yellow. The jakarundi are perhaps the most talented wokani among wild rakasta. Although this hasn’t been proven, some sages in Texeiras think that there may be some elven blood in them. Because of their magical talents, they are usually welcome among the jakar clans for the help they may offer. When using their natural burst of energy, jakarundi can cast one spell normally available to a wokan of half their experience level (rounded up). A jakarundi must succeed a Wisdom check at this time to choose a spell, else it is chosen at random among first-level spells. If not cast before the end of the energy burst, this spell vanishes on its own. Non-spellcasters make their Wisdom check with a -2 penalty, while spellcasting jakarundi benefit from a +2 bonus. AL: any non-lawful.

Lynxman: This strange rakasta claimed the coldest regions of Mystara. On Davania, these nomads travel as far as the southern tip of the Brasol Range. On Skothar and Brun, they do not venture past the Nentsun Plateaus, the Hyborean Reaches, or the Wyrmsteeth Range. Recognizable by their tail, shortened as a protection against extreme colds, tufted ears, stocky bodies, and big broad paws, lynxmen are notorious for their thick neck ruffle when angered. Its pelage varies from reddish-tawny or cream with faint spots and facial lines in Davania forests, to grey in Skothar and Brun woodlands. In frozen regions, lynxmen turn pure white to blend in with the icy background. These hardy felids travel the dark frozen expanses of the polar rims leading to Mystara’s Hollow World. Their natural instinct guides them through these treacherous lands. Lynxmen travel between the two worlds according to the cycles linked to the clans’ own totems, signs in the skies, or divinations from their priests. Davanian clans know the way to Hollow World’s Nithia, while their northern kin travel instead to the land of the Antalians. On this route, the latter compete with Norwold Malamutes. Lynxmen can move across snow at a normal speed. When using their natural energy burst, lynxmen can shake off the effects of any cold-based attack, or survive a situation where natural cold would be fatal. For example, a lynxman accidentally fainto the sea in polar conditions might crawl out and still survive with one hit point left instead of freezing to death. It could also shake off all damage from a magical cone of cold. The energy burst ends immediately after any one such situation occurs. AL: any.

Mountain Rakasta: The mountain rakasta have claimed the entire continent of Brun as their native land. They favor above all unpopulated areas where they can freely hunt. If unchecked, these adaptable athletes claim any vacant land, including forests, swamps, grasslands, and semi-desert regions such as Terra Vermelha and Grande Carrascal in the Savage Coast. Humanoids usually get in their way, both as prey and hunter. As a result, the widely scattered tribes of mountain rakasta have adopted mountain ranges such as the Endworld Line, the Kurish Massif, and even the Wyrmsteeth Range as their true natural habitat. The mountain rakasta’s pelage varies from plain brown, being the most common in the northern climes, to sometimes reddish or almost black. Accustomed to broken terrain, these adroit stalkers developed acrobatic skills unparalleled among rakasta. Many humanoids, both with awe and fear, have reported the ability of the Yutin people, as they call them, to perform stunning leaps. The mountain rakasta use this skill to leap over humanoid camp walls and moats, up into trees, or down from a rocky ledges, to stalk a prey or evade a sudden threat. When using their energy burst, mountain rakasta choose to boost either their Strength or their Dexterity. They also have a free acrobatics skill with the following differences - broad jumping: no running start is ever needed for any leap, and the distance is 3d6 + Dexterity; upward leap: 2d4 + half Dexterity (rounded up); downward leap: 3d12 + Dexterity. AL: any.

Ocelotl: Although they are ground-dwellers, these wild rakasta favor forested regions on northwestern Davania and the southern half of the Arm of the Immortals. There aren’t ocelotl tribes or nations, just scattered families traveling the land, selling their wares, entertaining villages, and telling their legends. A few easterners also know them as the Trigillos Errantes. The ocelotl has one of the most beautiful coats among rakasta. This of course, makes them the target of some unscrupulous easterners. Spots cover their cream to tawny coats. A darker ring surrounds the spots’ pale interior, which frequently join with each other, forming long, horizontal chains that almost become stripes. A white spot on the back of their ears gives the impression from a distance of two eyes staring backward. The ocelotl people once had the opportunity to honor the evil Immortal Atzanteotl in exchange for power and protection. They recognized him for what he really was and moved on, choosing their own path ilife. Angered with their attitude, Atzanteotl cast a curse upon them, condemning the Ocelotl never to rise as a powerful people. Over the centuries following the curse, the Ocelotl spread out to the land in search of a secret to break the curse. Although they never found anything concrete, they did accumulate knowledge of Atzanteotl’s evil and a few ways to counter it. Their unwavering resistance to the Immortal eventually caused Atzanteotl to lose interest in them, allowing the ocelotl to slowly work on their quest to weaken the curse and someday, perhaps, to break it. The curse consists of deadly epidemics striking ocelotl communities of more than 30. In their quest the ocelotl developed the talent to heal their own wounds, once, when using their natural energy burst. If most of their wounds were caused by chaotic or evil magic, the ocelotl can cure up to three hit points per experience level. The latter includes spells cast by chaotic or evil spellcasters, or damage from chaotic or evil magical weapons. In all other situations, the cure affects up to one hit point per experience level. The ocelotl remain unable to alter Atzanteotl’s epidemics, however. AL: any non-chaotic.

Pardasta: These clever rakasta can be found almost anywhere on Mystara, away from heavily populated centers - that is, regions with few human or demi-human settlements. Small tribes have been discovered fairly close to human settlements, but these rakasta are elusive and sneaky enough that people often fail to notice their presence at all. Their natural habitat includes any sort of woodland, savannahs, semi-deserts, and rugged mountains. Pardasta tribes exist especially on Skothar, Bellissaria, Ochalea, Cestia, and Davania, in regions stretching roughly between the 30th parallel. Their pelage can be fairly short and sleek in warmer climes to deeply furred in the north. Base color varies from pale straw, tan, or gray-buff to bright reddish- yellow, or jet black for natives of heavily forested regions. Small spots cover their head and necks, turning to larger rosettes on their back and flanks. The base color of their throats, inner limbs, and belly remains white. Pardasta are smart and strong enough to live near other rakasta or human settlements without too much difficulty. They often outwit the powerful simbasta (q.v.), they know how to avoid angering the mighty sherkasta (q.v.), and if threatened by humans they always find a way to exact a terrible revenge against their aggressors. Pardasta are supreme stalkers and always seem to find their quarry. They excel as thieves, spies, and scouts. They generally dislike tabaxi, unless they share the same alignment. When using their energy burst, pardasta are immune to all mind-altering attacks (fear, sleep, hypnotism, charm, etc). This does not affect their natural fear of water or spells that already had been cast upon them before they used their energy burst. They also have a permanent +2 bonus to their initiative rolls. AL: any non-lawful.

Rakastodon Fatalis: As with the cave rakasta (q.v.), the onslaught of more adaptable races on the surface world all but doomed the rakastodon to survive in the Hollow World as yet another witness of Mystara’s forgotten past. It is the direct descendant of the tiger-like Ba-steh. Rakastodons now live in high grass or forested areas in the Hollow World’s equatorial regions. Rakastodons are a stump-tailed brutes, with massive forelimbs and saber-like fangs. Pelage varies, but a reddish-orange color seems common among their kin, sometimes with stripes. Their most impressive feature, the dirk-like fangs, are used to deliver the final blow to an immobilized victim. The Rakastodons have been traditional rivals of the cave rakasta. As primitive as they may be, these chaotic loners remain at odds with the cave rakasta pride-oriented society. The sheer size, power, and organization of cave rakasta have prevented their kind from falling prey to these lethal hunters. A Rakastodon may topple an opponent when using its natural energy burst. If the opponent is smaller or lighter than the rakastodon, it is automatically brought down with any successful claw attack. Else, the opponent needs to succeed a Strength check for each of the rakastodon’s successful claw attacks. If the opponent’s Strength is less than the rakastodon’s, apply a -2 penalty for each point of difference. Once knocked down, a victim must succeed a saving throw vs. Paralyzation or die instantly from the rakastodon’s next successful bite attack. AL: any non-lawful.

Servasta: These wild felids remain one of the lesser known eastern Davanian rakasta. Their realm lies on the savannahs and scrubs, where they compete with the pardasta and simbasta (q.v.). There, they call themselves kisongo. Lean and lanky, the debonnaire servasta can be recognized by their small heads perched over slender necks and surmounted by huge bat-like ears. Small black spots cover their tawny coats, with dark rings and a black tip marking their short tails. The servasta use their huge ears to detect underground creatures, a talent that goes back thousand of years when their ancestors hunted simple rodents. They have an additional +10% bonus to hear underground noises, but with a -1% penalty for each foot in depth. Nowadays, servasta have developed a taste for other creatures also dwelling beneath the surface, incldemi-humans and humanoids, halflings being a most delectable treat. The servasta rely on an elaborate combat style that consists of stalking underground prey from the surface until the latter comes out. Then, they jump upward and pounce down on the unsuspecting victim. Servasta can use this form of attack at will against prey less than a foot tall. On larger prey, the servasta’s natural energy burst is necessary for this form of attack to succeed at all. If it does, servasta may either inflict maximum damage with any melee weapon at hand (including possibly a thief’s backstab) or take a firm grip over the prey’s back and arms, allowing an automatic neck or shoulder bite every round until shaken off. The latter requires a successful Strength check with a -2 penalty. Servasta have a free acrobatics skill. AL: any non-lawful.

Sherkasta: Mightiest among the greater rakasta, sherkasta prowl the forests and swamps of sSkothar. Some have also claimed the mountain forests of northern Skothar. The southerners, who call themselves the Harimau-Belang, remains the most common. Their base color runs from reddish-orange to reddish-yellow, with dark stripes and white or cream fur inside their limbs. Their northern cousins, the Tagh, show a thicker, light grey or white pelage, with brown or black stripes. The more reclusive sherkasta form small clans and shun contact with races. Other individuals sometimes meet with neighboring populations of humans or demihumans. Sherkasta, because of their size and ferocious appearance are normally considered evil monsters, or at least dangerous predators by other races. However, with time, a few become more accepted by the local population. The sherkasta loathe the rakshasa, evispirits resemble them. For centuries, individual rakshasas have subjected clans to a despotic rule or slavery. These spirits resort, to magic, fear, or blackmail to maintain their hold over the clans and influence their minds. Sherkasta can only unmask rakshasas for what they really are when attacking and realizing fangs and claws aren’t hurting them. Rakshasas delight in pitting their feline slaves against humankind to further their own schemes. This has done great harm to the sherkasta clans and their relations with human populations. The power of the rakshasas over sherkasta clans can last decades, but usually a sherkasta escapes to return later, when it has reached a sufficient experience level to challenge the spirit and free its clan. Sherkasta and weretigers, on the other hand, get along fairly well and sometimes ally against a common foe. Sherkasta can also maintain an empathic link with common tigers. When using their natural energy burst, sherkasta can virtually shake off the effects of magic previously cast upon them. A successful check dispels a first-level spell, provided it originated from a lower-level spellcaster. Sherkasta cannot alter the effects of area spells or spells that are not cast directly upon them (fireballs, stinking clouds, phantasmal force, etc). For example, a 10th-level sherkasta can dispel a charm cast by a 7-HD rakshasa, but not one cast by a 13th-level spellcaster. Furthermore, at every fifth additional level, the sherkasta may increase its spell immunity one level (second-level spells at 6th level, third-level spells at 11th level, etc). AL: any (non-evil).

Simbasta: These regal creatures once roamed most of Mystara. Over the centuries, they too have retreated in the face of human and demi-human hegemony and now live essentially on the continent of Davania, in the savannahs stretching around the Aryptian Basin, from the Adakkian Sound to the Pass of Cestia and the Gulf of Mar. They call themselves the Ikimizi. Unlike most other rakasta, male and female simbasta look different from each other. The normal pelage color for both is a tawny yellow that blends with their natural environment of dry grasses. Color may vary from ginger to black, with the male sporting a huge mane, making it appear even taller than the powerful sherkasta. This mane sets apart the simbasta male from the female. Again, unlike other felids, simbasta are sociable creatures, naturally living in large clans called prides. Females, often siblings with their cubs, originally formed the core of the pride, with peaceful males ensuring safety and progeny. This arrangement demanded that young males born to pride simbasta leave to avoid unhealthy lineages. The stronger male simbasta usually headed the pride, until driven off by a younger or more powerful male. The first duty of the new master was then to eliminate all existing cubs, which among Ikimizi still is an ancient religious ritual. A brutal and shocking practice by human standards, it nevertheless ensured the strength of the prides. From there, a pervasive Code of Honor was slowly established, governing the behavior and society of modern simbasta. As a result of their solemn and dignified ways, the proud simbasta are the only rakasta capable of becoming paladins. Simbasta generally consider normal lions as simple animals, yet they enjoy taming mature males - something they can do very well (+2 bonus to the skill). The relation between them and this animal is one of strength, where the simbasta means to demonstrate its own power before eventually releasing the lion. They view themselves as the rightful and deserving heirs of Kum-rah’s legacy. They honor him under that name and tolerate none other amongst their prides, including Ba-steh so far. Simbasta often are at odds with wemics, which they consider inferior half-breeds. It is in the simbasta’s temperament to want to control and dominate. As a result, simbasta’s energy burst allows them to attack and save as if three experience levels higher, and with an additional +2 bonus on all damage, if striking to subdue an opponent. A subdued opponent views the simbasta with awe and immediately ceases combat. When subdued, unwilling PCs may salute the simbasta and leave with the intention never to cross this simbasta’s path again. NPCs and “willing” PCs may instead embrace the simbasta’s authority and offer their blades in servitude. AL: any.

Snow Pardasta: Snow pardasta tribes are scattered above forest lines on the northern mountains of Skothar (Nentsun Plateaus) and Brun (Hyborean Reaches, Norwold). On Davania, some can be found as far north as the Ice Peaks and the Diamond Ring. Their thick, long fur protects them from the intense cold of their natural habitat. Small spots cover their heads and neck, becoming large irregular circles on their back and flanks. Their pale grey fur makes them difficult to detect against the bleak background of high mountain rocks. Hardly anyone competes with the snow pardasta, considering how remote their homelands are. There, they hunt the ibex, the markhor, and as opportunities present themselves, marmots and other small mammals. Occasionally they wage sporadic wars against encroaching sasquatches. Their villages, often built around temples, include a few free-standing buildings made of stones and slates, and walls covering the entrance to natural caves. Snow pardasta can tread ice and snow without movement penalties. Although they cannot boost their Dexterity ratings as mountain rakasta do (q.v.), snow pardasta benefit from the same leaping abilities. Furthermore, a snow pardasta can blend into a rock big enough to contain the whole creature or into a large chunk of ice for the duration of its energy burst, after which it reappears outside. While doing so, it can see and hear what happens outside, but it cannot communicate or cast spells. The snow pardasta is at a disadvantage outside its natural terrain. When exposed to warm weather or less mountainous terrain, the snow pardasta suffers a -2 penalty on all saving throws, ability checks, and attack rolls. AL: Neutral.

Domestic Rakasta: These rakasta can be found in just about any region of Mystara, much as their lupin rivals. The term “domestic” is by no means derogatory but merely a common way of referring to more “civilized” rakasta, especially in the eyes of neighboring humans with whom they interact more easily than greater or wild rakasta ever could. Afrom their physical appearances, domestic rakasta have the same natural ability - a legendary power that makes them very successful indeed, even when compared to their more powerful cousins. While a domestic rakasta uses its energy burst, it can literally avoid death. In game terms, if the rakasta would have been killed, it survives instead but with only one hit point left. It can perform this feat no more than nine times in its life - thus the proverbial nine lives. However, each time a “life” is forfeited, the rakasta permanently loses a point of Charisma. Physical appearances are linked to the domestic breeds; however, many variables are possible. Either pick a breed with its corresponding characteristics, or roll at random on Tables 4a-4c.

Unusual Breeds: Rakasta may bear some blood ties with foreign breeds. These creatures are very rare and usually have a special goal in life. Among a few documented caseare rakasta with elven or even draconic bloodlines, especially with the mighty dragonne. Table 5a shows what lineage a rakasta might have (if any at all) and its strength. The lineage of a rakasta has no bearing on its breed or physical appearance. It is possible to have mixed heritage (rolling 2 or 3 tens and 2 ones, for example). Rolling anything other than tens and ones or different numbers would indicate a total lack of a clear bloodline, other than the rakasta’s own breed. Lineage generally is hereditary but can be weakened or strengthened through successive family generations. If either of the parents has no clear lineage, then roll 5d10 on Table 5a for each cub. If both parents have at least a trace of a bloodline, roll 1d20 for each cub. An odd result relates to the father’s lineage, an number to the mother's. With a score of 19-20, lineage is strengthened by one category On a roll of 7-18, lineage is passed on as is. On a roll of 1-6, lineage is weakened by one category. If either parent had equal traces of two different bloodlines, then choose one at random (50%) as the one passed on to the cub. Feel free as a DM to assign different dice numbers to additional bloodlines for use with Table 5a, as appropriate to your campaign. For example, lammasu, feystags, cath shee, and ebon tigers could be related to some rakasta as well. Table 5b shows examples of stronger bloodlines.

 

Other Issues

Unfortunately for rakasta, some human or humanoid cultures covet rakasta for certain valuable items, usually spell components, medicinal ingredients, valuable pelts, and so forth. Items involved are the whiskers, fangs, claws, bones, or blood of greater rakasta. They also involve the coats of many wild and greater rakasta as well. Black rakasta (domestic) also receive unwanted attention from some wizards. The wild and greater rare often thought of as monsters or dangerous predators by human cultures. Many believe them to be lycanthropes and hunt them down. Choosing a greater rakasta or even wild rakasta as a PC to adventure into human lands requires precautions to avoid constant difficulties. Disguises can help. Support from local nobility (the PC is hired by a local leader) may do the trick. Fame also does much to reassure villagers that not all rakasta are dangerous monsters. It’s up to PCs to establish such a rapport with local populations.

Rakasta societies adopted legal practices that may astound human neighbors. For example, the Kingdom of Bellayne on the Savage Coast, which considers itself very civilized, does not usually resort to the death penalty or long term prison - they prefer instead declawing, neutering, or banishing their criminals. Simbasta warriors, on the other hand, cast out known cowards, but only after cutting off their tails, which among simbasta is much worse than death. Elsewhere, hanging by one‘s whiskers or tail may be considered for lesser crimes.

Rakasta are thought to have a short attention span. In situations that aren’t life-threatening, rakasta are easily distracted. They tend to switch their interest without warning or reason. Although this is left entirely to the player’s desire to roleplay, the DM may request an occasional Wisdom check. Rakasta also are a playful folk, especially when large balls of wool, rodents, fish, or birds are involved. Their presence may require a Wisdom check on the part of the rakasta to keep focusing on the task at hand.

Another game, the cat’s cradle, remains a child’s diversion at least among humans. For some rakasta cultures, however, it has a greater meaning. For example, among rakasta tribes of Davania, a 10th-level druid using a cat’s cradle can attempt to diminish the bite of the equatorial sun. In effect, it causes clouds to mask the sun and bring rain (control weather). It can attempt this once per moon cycle with a successful Wisdom check. The idea is to “catch the sun” in the cradle’s strands, as clouds of rain seem to do. Likewise, tribes living near the arctic circle and beyond can try the same to calm a winter storm and bring out the sun (trapping it up in the sky).

 

 

Table 1: Racial Modifiers and Other Statistics

Breed

Statistics

Size

Weight

 

 

 

 

Fear of

Water

St

Dx

Co

In

Wi

Ch

(inches)

(cn)

MV

Bite

Claws

Roar

Ancestors (Strength 16-19, max 12 Intelligence & Wisdom)

Cave Rakasta

+3

-2

-

-1

-2

+1

82+St

SizexSt/0.22

120

1d12

1d4

Y

High

Rakastodon Fatalis

+3

-1

-

-2

-2

-

76+St

SizexSt/0.21

120

2d6

1d4+1

Y

Moderate

Greater Rakasta (min 14 Strength, max. 14 Wisdom)

Fast Runner

-

+2

-

-

-2

-

62+St

SizexSt/0.55

150

1d4+1

1d2

N

High

Jakar

+2

+2

-1

-

-2

-

68+St

SizexSt/0.4

90

1d8

1d3

Y

-

Mountain Rakasta

+1

+2

-1

-

-2

-

68+St

SizexSt/0.42

120

1d6

1d3

N

Moderate

Pardasta

+1

+1

-

-

-2

-

64+St

SizexSt/0.44

90

1d6

1d3

Y

Moderate

Sherkasta

+2

-

-

-

-2

-

79+St

SizexSt/0.24

120

1d10

1d4+1

Y

-

Simbasta

+2

-

-

-

-2

+1

73+St

SizexSt/0.24

120

1d10

1d4

Y

High

Snow Pardasta

+1

-

+1

-

-2

-

60+St

SizexSt/0.43

90

1d6

1d3

N

-

Wild Rakasta (min 12 Strength, min 8 Dexterity, max 16 Wisdom

Caracasta

+1

-

+1

-

-2

-

56+St

SizexSt/0.43

90

1d4+1

1d3

N

High

Cloud Pardasta

+1

+1

-

-

-2

-

57+St

SizexSt/0.46

90

1d4

1d2

N

Moderate

Jakarundi

-

+1

-

+1

-2

-

55+St

SizexSt/0.46

90

1d3

1d2

N

-

Lynxman

-

-

+2

-

-2

-

58+St

SizexSt/0.45

120

1d4

1d2

N

Moderate

Ocelotl

-

+1

+1

-

-2

-

56+St

SizexSt/0.46

90

1d3

1d2

N

-

Servasta

-

+2

-

-

-2

-

58+St

SizexSt/0.5

120

1d4

1d2

N

High

Domestic Rakasta (min 9 Strength, min 8 Dexterity

Alley Rakasta

*

*

*

*

-2

*

54+St

SizexSt/0.46

90

1d4

1d2

N

Varies

Basic Rakasta

-

+2

-

-

-2

-

64+St

SizexSt/0.42

90

1d4

1d2

N

High

Domestic Rakasta

-

+2

-1

+1

-2

-

52+St

SizexSt/0.47

90

1d2

1d2

N

High

 

*See Above

MV: Movement rate in feet per turn (unencumbered).

Claws: When not using weapons (except war claws), rakasta can make three attacks per round (claw/claw/bite) plus another two with rear claws if both front claws hit (war claws cannot be worn on rear feet). Strength bonuses apply. All rakastas have retractile claws to some extent.

 

Table 2: Special Abilities and Weaknesses

 

Adult Rakastas

Young & Old Rakasta

Cubs & Venerable Rakastas

Infravision: 60'

60'

30'

Balance and Reflexes: sustain half damage from any fall

Sustain three quarter damage from any fall

Normal falling damage

Detect Invisible & Ethereal Beings: +4 bonus for detection

+2 bonus for detection

No bonus

Blind Fighting: free skill

free skill

none for cubs

Natural Concealment: 50% chance of success within 100', or 70% beyond 100'

Old: 60% (80% beyond 100')

Young: 30% (50% beyond 100')

Venerable: 70% (90% beyond 100')

Cubs: 10% (30% beyond 100')

Detect Noise: 15% chance to detect noise as a 1st-level thief. Thieves add this to their normal chance

10% chance of success

5% chance of success

Roar: opponents within 100' of the rakasta make their attack rolls and saving throws at -1 for 1d6+1 rounds following the roar.

Within 80' for 1d4+1 rounds

Within 60' for 1d4 rounds

None for cubs

Special weakness: Fear of water; -1 to saving throws vs. sound-based attacks

Fear of water; -1 penalty vs. sound-based attacks

Fear of water

 

Table 3: Class Limitations

 

Breed 

Fighter

Holy Warrior

Knight

Cleric

Druid

Magic-User

Thief

Bard

Mystic

Ancestor

Greater

Wild

Domestic

Basic

+

+

+

+

+

A

B

A

A

A

-

B

-

-

-

C

C

C

+

+

C

C

C

+

+

-

D

D

+

+

-

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

-

E

F

+

+

A - Druidic Knight only

B - Simbasta only

C - Shaman only (Ancestors limited to level 6 shaman, level 12 druid, jakar and snow pardasta to level 15 shaman, level 12 druid, other greater rakasta to level 9 shaman, level 12 druid, wild rakasta to level 9 shaman, level 36 druid).

D - Wokan only (Greater rakasta limited to level 6, jakarundi level 9, other wild rakasta level 6)

Shamans and wokani need extra XP as given in GAZ10.

E - Mountain rakasta and simbasta only.

F - Snow pardasta and lynxman only

Holy Fighter - Avenger Defender, Druidic Knight, Paladin

 

Table 4a: Hair Characteristics

 

1d20

1

2-10

11-15

16-20

Length

Hairless*

Short

Medium

Lon

1d6

1-2

3-4

5-6

Texture

Fine

Coarse

Dense

1d6

1-3

4

5

6

Form

Straight

Crinkled

Curly

Wavy

 

*Essentially a very short, down-like fur. Do not roll for texture or form

 

Table 4b: Domestic Coat Patterns & Colors

 

1d20

Coat Patterns

1d100

Coat Color

1

Colorpoint: generally a light coat (white, ivory or pale cream) with darker extremities (lilac, chocolate, blue, sable, or ginger) covering the nose, ears, tail, and paws.

1

2-21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29-33

34-38

39

40-44

45-63

64

65

66

67

68-72

73

74

76-80

81-100 

Auburn

Black

Blue

Bronze

Brown

Champagne

Charcoal

Chocolate

Cinnamon

Cream

Fawn

Ginger

Golden

Gray

Lavender

Lilac

Peach

Pewter

Platinum

Ruddy

Sable

Silver

White

2-4

Particolor, 2: White coat with patches of a random secondary color.

5

Particolor, 3: White coat with patches of two other random colors.

6

Patches of black, cream, ginger, and white.

7-9

Tabby, Classic: dark oyster-shaped patterns on the flanks, butterfly-shaped markings on the shoulders, and rings on the tails. Roll for a basic coat color other than a very dark color. 10% chance white patches are present.

10

Tabby, Patched: patches of brown and ginger with darker stripes. 10% chance white patches are present.

11

Tabby, Spotted: darker spots extending to the tail; roll for basic coat color other than a very dark coloration. 10% chance white patches are present.

12

Tabby, Striped: dark stripe patterns; roll for a basic coat color other than a very dark coloration. 10% chance white patches are present.

13

Tortoiseshell (torbie, tortie): black or blue, cream, and ginger colors evenly intermingled. 10% chance white patches are present.

14-19

Uniform: one single color. Some colors may be solid or show a lighter underlying coloration, depending on whether the hair is tipped, shaded, smoked, or ticked.

20

Van: similar to colorpoint except only the top of the head, ears, and tail are of a darker color.

 

Table 4c: Physical Features

 

1d6

1-2

3-4

5-6

Face

Round, pug-faced

Intermediate

Wedge-faced

1d6

1

2-4

5-6

Ears

Small (pointed, round or folded)

Medium, pointed

Large, pointed

1d6

1-3

4-5

6

Tail

Normal

Long

Stubby

 

Table 5a: Basic Bloodlines

 

5d10

4-5 tens

3 tens

2 tens

2 ones

3 ones

4-5 ones

Ancient Lineage

Strong Elven

Weak Elven

Faint Elven

Faint Dragonne

Weak Dragonne

Strong Dragonne

5d10

4-5 nines

3 nines

2 nines

2 eights

3 eights

4-5 eights

Ancient Lineage

Strong Sphinx

Weak Sphinx

Faint Sphinx

Faint Displacer Beast

Weak Displacer Beast

Strong Displacer Beast

 

Table 6b: Effects of Bloodlines

 

Lineage

Strength

Effect

Elven*

Strong

1. Longevity: 180 + 2d8 years

2. Immune to ghoul paralysis

 

Weak

1. +3 on wokan level limit.

2. Constitution -1

Dragonne**

Strong

1. Roar: as dragonne with half its normal range

2. Alignment Neutral

 

Weak

1. Tough skinned: natural AC 6

2. Charisma -1 (coarse hair, bulgy eyes, solitary temperament, hissing and growling voice)

Sphinx

Strong

Male: Roar requires a saving throw vs. petrification or opponents receive a +1 penalty on Initiative for 1d4 rounds. Female: can cast clairaudiance, Clairvoyance, and lore once per day with a single growl.

 

Weak

Male: allows greater rakasta roar, or double range for greater rakasta. Female: free literacy, ancient history, and poetry skills.

Displacer Beast

Strong

1. Can use magical displacement for 1d6 rounds/day.

2. Can grow two tentacles for 1d6 rounds/day (no armored allowed). Damage 1d6 per attack. Can either attack once with each tentacle or normally with weapons.

 

Weak

1. +2 bonus to AC due to unusual shifting movements.

2. Alignment cannot be Lawful.

 

*Woodland rakasta and domestic breeds only

**Simbasta only

 

Squamous ones

Shazak lizard men

Shazaks are very similar to lizard men. For the most part, they are peaceful primitives who have only recently begun to develop art and a written language. Many are used by Herathian nobles as mercenaries and they have served as front-line troops for Herath in times of war.

Shazaks' skin tones range from dark green to a grayish brown, with their scales giving them a flecked or dappled appearance. Their tails average three feet long and are not prehensile. Shazaks usually have golden yellow eyes with slit pupils much like those of cats; occasionally, a shazak is born with brilliant green eyes, and these are marked to become wokani or shamans. There is little overt physical difference between male and female shazaks to the unpracticed eye.

Shazaks usually wear loincloths and a harness that holds their weapons. They like jewelry, particularly jewelry with quartz and opals. Those in service to Herathian nobles wear whatever armor they are given to wear.

Though they can be fierce when aroused, shazaks are for the most part peaceful. They are both tough and cunning, having been first abandoned in the bayous, then forced to move to the woodlands and adapt when the savage, brutal gator men moved in and began to hunt them. They have formed a stable government, begun the production of art and goods, developed a written language, and learned the rudiments of trade. They make dependable mercenary soldiers. In the last century, shazaks have domesticated huge bats that are used as mounts by their warriors, important wokani, shamans, or the Shaz.

Shazaks live in family groups within larger tribes. Many are potters, woodsmen, fishers, and hunters. Others are various sorts of warriors, thieves, wizards, and priests. All fulfill their roles within their tribes. Females are held in as much esteem as males, perhaps because their original war leader was female.

The shazaks have their own language (known as shazak) that is nearly identical to the Malpheggi language used by the more civilized lizard folk in the rest of the world. It has a syllabary used by shazaks, some cay-men, and a few gator man wokani. Slag is little spoken among the shazaks, though some do speak it because of their trade dealings with Herath.

 

Gator men:

Savage and hardy, with a bloodthirsty streak bred into them by the Herathians when they crossed them with alligators, the gator men of Ator are a crude but powerful people. They escaped Herathian control long ago and fled into the Bayou, where they bred so quickly that the Herathians were unable to eradicate them. Their favorite prey were the shazaks who lived in the bayou. The shazaks were soon forced to abandon the bayou to the more ferocious gator men.

Gator men are covered with deep green scales. Their heads resemble those of alligators, with large mouths filled with sharp teeth and slitted pupils in their eyes. Eye color ranges from an almost toxic-looking yellow to a deep red. They favor simple clothing such as loincloths and tunics and may wear bandoleers to carry their equipment and weapons.

Something savage always lurks just beneath the surface in even the calmest and most civilized gator man. Many are evil-tempered and prone to excessive violence, though some are more controlled and reasonable. Gator men are not as advanced as shazaks and, indeed, tend to view them as tasty snacks. Some few among the gator men have learned to control their harsher natureand violent impulses enough to become adventurers.

The gator men hunt and fish in the Bayou and defend their home from all interlopers. They are more likely to kill strangers than open a dialogue with them. They are beginning to develop the concept of family and tribal unity beyond that of monarch and subjects, though monarchs still rule through fear, brutality, and the support of the shamans. Any monarch who is outdone in savagery by a lesser gator man can look forward to a challenge for the right to rule the tribe.

Though gator men are able to assume many roles within an adventuring party, they must be treated with caution. At any time, a gator man may lose control and become terribly savage, even turning against his companions. Besides this, they have a tendency to be far too direct and brutal in their dealings, and this may cause problems for parties, especially if they are trying to be diplomatic. Nonetheless, once a gator man joins a party, he regards the party members asblood kin, to be supported in all situations (of course, the gator man's understanding of the situation - or lack thereof - may cause a few problems, even then).

 

Cay-men

Cay-men are quite dexterous, but most lack any real strength. They have skin tones that range from a dull brown to a rich green and have black eyes in which the pupil cannot be seen. When not in combat, cay-men prefer to wear tuniclike wrappings and feathered headdresses. They like small bone and feather jewelry as well.

Cay-men are peaceful and avoid combat whenever possible. Their small, agile frames are far more suited to thievery than fighting. When defending their homes and villages, however, they can become quite fierce. In general, cay-men are a proud people, easily hurt by the sliother races unintentionally bestow upon them. Often, they are not taken seriously and the Herathian judgment that they were poor builders has led them to frenzied attempts to construct complex structures despite their lack of understanding of architecture and engineering. On the other hand, they are endlessly enthusiastic and certain that they can succeed.

 

The experience advancement for these three races is given in the table below. Note that Constitution bonuses should be added only when a PC is created and every time it gains a new level, up to 9th level. None of these creatures have any special abilities (see “Miscellaneous”). Young lizardkin (i.e., player characters when they are first rolled up) each start with a relatively low intelligence score, as shown on the Intelligence table below. Don’t forget to reward good role-playing of truly “primitive” characters!

 

 

Intelligence

Race

Common lizard men

Shazak’s kin

All cay-men

All gator men

Starting

1d4+2

1d4+2

1d4+2

1d4+2

Max.

8

12

14

10

 

Each time one of these PCs gains a level, an Intelligence check should be rolled on 1d20. If the check is failed, the PC gains a point of Intelligence, up to the racial limits given in the Intelligence table. In other words, PCs gain in Intelligence as they gain levels, but the gain becomes increasingharder to achieve.

Shamans & wokani: Should the character decide to become a spell-caster, the experience table of the lizardkin will have to recalculated, incorporating the experience points requirements listed below. The indicated XP have to be gained before actually acquiring the corresponding spellcasting level. This means that one cannot start with a spell-casting character when the PC is created.

 

Spellcasting

level

1

2

3

4

5

6

Extra XP

required

1,000 XP

2,000 XP

4,000 XP

8,000 XP

16,000 XP

32,000 XP

 

For example, if a 3rd-level cay-man wanted to become a 1st-level spellcaster upon reaching his next level, he would need to reach a total of 16,000 XP instead of 15,000. In order to cast spells, a shaman must have a wisdom of 9 or better. A wokan needs an Intelligence of 9 or better. All spell-casters must be at least 1st level in their race to be able to cast spells. For all lizardkin, levels in spell-casting are limited to S6 and W4, as per standard rules on monster spell-casters, page 215-216 in the Rules Cyclopedia.

Languages: Many of the sounds used in lizardkin expression are difficult to reproduce with a human’s vocal cords. In general, names are very short, one or two syllables at most. Gator men use anything that sounds like chewing, ripping, rumbling, and other throat noises along with deep voices. Lizard men prefer clicks, rattles, snaps, and generally raspy near-human voices. Cay-men hiss, wheeze, sneeze, whistle, hum, purr, or use a weak, lispy voice when communicating with humans. Body language is used in conjunction with spoken words. For example, all of the squamous ones use slight movements of their tails as punctuation or signs of courtesy and respect. Greater movements of their tails express deeper emotions. Lizard men also use quick motions of their forked tongues when thinking or when suspicious of something.

The shazaks have their own language (known as shazak) that is nearly identical to the Malpheggi language used by the more civilized lizard folk in the rest of the world. Slag is little spoken among the shazaks, though some do speak it because of their trade dealings with Herath. Gator men and cay-men speak a variant or dialect of the shazak tongue. A few of their wokani can write, using the symbols of the shazak written language.

Miscellaneous: All lizardkin instinctively know how to swim. Lizard men can hold their breath as long as normal humans. Cay-men can stay underwater without discomfort up to three minutes, gator men up to five minutes. All lizardkin can hide in swamp vegetation (30% chance, at least 10’ away from observer). Lizardkin all have 90' infravision and, for simplicity’s sake, a natural armor class of 7. Addition of any armor of AC7 or worse only improves the lizardkin’s natural AC by a +1 bonus. Shields work as usual. For armor of AC6 or better, use the AC rating of the armor worn, with a +1 bonus. For those nit-pickers who demand to have gator men with the standard natural AC of 3, it may be better to allow AC 7 at level -3, AC5 at level -2, AC4 at level -1, and finally AC3 at level 0 (adult tribesman). Likewise, when first created, a gator man’s bite causes only 1d4 points of damage. At higher levels, the bite inflicts 1d6 points of damage for every 2 HD, rounded down. Thus, the most damage any gator man’s bite could inflict would be 6d6 points.

 

Gator men have trouble controlling their tempers and suppressing their inherently violent and savage natures. Any time a gator man is placed in a situation that he or she cannot understand or that is frustrating, the character must make a Wisdom check at –2. Failure indicates that the character has become enraged (like the "courage" entry under the emotion spell) and remains so for five rounds or until the rage is countered (by magic or through removal of the frustration). Success indicates that the character has controlled his or her temper and may choose actions other than blindly striking out in rage. Whenever the gator man receives at least 8 points of damage from a single blow, the character must make the same roll as above or throw caution to the winds in his single-minded attack on whoever caused the wound. In this case, the rage can only be stopped magically, when five rounds are up, or by the death of the target.

 

 

Squamous Ones Table

 

Cay-man

 

Lizard man

 

Gator Man

 

Level

-3

-2

-1

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

XP

-

-

-1,000

0

1,000

3,000

7,000

15,000

31,000

63,000

129,000

259,000

519,000*

HD

-

-

1d8

2d8

3d8

4d8

-

5d8

6d8

7d8

-

8d8

+2 hp**

 

XP

-

-

-1,200

0

1,200

3,600

8,400

18,000

37,200

75,600

152,400

306,000

606,000*

HD

-

-

1d8+1

2d8+1

3d8+2

4d8+3

-

5d8+3

6d8+4

7d8+4

-

8d8+5

+2 hp**

 

XP

-63,000

-47,250

-31,500

0

63,000

189,000

41,000

741,000

1,041,000

1,341,000

1,641,000

1,941,000

2,241,000*

HD

1d8

3d8

5d8

7d8

8d8

9d8

-

10d8

11d8

12d8

-

13d8

+2 hp**

* +300,000 XP per extra level

** + 2 hit points per level; constitution bonuses no longer apply

 

Abilities

Race Max.

Lizard man

Cay-man

Gator man

Str

18

+1

-1

+2

Int

16

-1

-1

-2

Wis

16

-1

-1

-2

Dex

18

-

+2

-

Con

18

-

-

+1

Cha

18*

-

-

-1

 

* Charisma applies only between creatures of the same race; penalize Charisma -2 when dealing with humanoids, and -5 when dealing with demihumans or humans. The natural -1 penalty to gator men's Charisma reflects the difficulty gator men have in getting along with each other.

 

Race

Height (inches)

Weight(cn)

Starting age

Maximum age

Cay-man

12+1d6

60+2d20

6+1d4

60+2d10

Lizard man

66+3d6

2000+5d100

15+1d4

150+5d10

Gator man

84+2d12

2750+6d100

10+1d4

72+3d6

 

Tortles

Tortles are bipedal turtles, standing about the same height as humans. They have inhabited the lands of the Savage Coast for thousands of years. Tortles have no real government; they live in small family dwellings, often within the borders of some other race's state. The creatures are generally peaceful, scholarly farmers, but they will defend their homes. Tortles have no hair; their skin is mostly olive or blue-green. Their back shellsare usually shinier and darker than their skin, while their front shells tend to be lighter, with a yellowish cast. A tortle's eyes look something like the eyes of humans, except that the pupils are horizontal ovals in shape. The irises are vibrantly colored, usually blue, but sometimes green or red. A tortle's mouth is beaklike and toothless and can deliver a vicious bite. Tortles are stocky, but most of their weight comes from their shells, so they tend to remain at the same weight throughout their adult lives, never growing fat or thin. Their arms and hands are shaped like those of humans, but thicker and tipped with sharp claws. Tortles can wield most weapons as easily as humans. Their tails measure about two feet long. Also, they usually wear clothing, though some may wear cloaks, belts, or harnesses for carrying tools and supplies. Despite their ancestry, tortles are not especially slow, either mentally or physically; however, they are thinkers who might ponder a question a little longer than most before answering. Most tortles are peaceful and slow to anger. While they have the same range of emotions as humans, tortles are not as demonstrative and often seem cold and distant to more passionate races. Tortles tend to be Lawful; Chaotic individuals are quite rare.

Tortles prefer warm climates and enjoy sunning themselves; they have little tolerance for cold. Native tortles have an advanced stone-age level of technology, using bows, staves, and other relatively modern implements. Most of the tortles of the Savage Coast have adapted to the ways of their neighbors, using metal tools and weapons, and tortle smiths are capable of making the finest implements. Tortles tend to restrict themselves to the tools of the culture in which they live. This adaptation to neighboring cultures carries over into all aspects of tortle society. Tortles who live outside the boundaries of other nations (the "free" tortles) tend to be simple farmers, many still using ancient "slash and burn" methods. Other free tortles live the simple, if demanding, lives of hunter-gatherers. However, most tortles dwell within other nations, where they are peasants (usually farme), living in the style of peasants of that nation. Tortle legends claim that the creatures once built cities of grandeur, but little real evidence exists to support this, other than the Monoliths of Zul, near Eusdria. These ruins include carvings, statues, pyramids, and obelisks, and a number of small buildings. Though sages debate incessantly, these are in fact the ruins of the tortles' brief flirtation with civilization just over 1,000 years ago. The monoliths are sacred to free tortles, who sometimes refer to themselves as "the Free Tortles of Zul." Tortles are most common in Bellayne and Renardy and on the beaches south of Renardy. Most modern free tortles live along the beaches in small familial groups, typically in huts made of mud and wood. A cluster of huts forms a village center, with outlying huts forming a perimeter of several hundred yards. Each tortle dwelling has an alarm of some sort, usually a horn or gong. Tortles stay in contact with their neighboring tortles, depending on one another for defense and assistance on major building or farming projects. A typical tortle lives about 50 years. The creatures mate only once in their lives and invariably die within a year afterward.(Tortles who do not mate can live to become extremely old, with little loss of vitality.) Mating takes place in late summer, egg-laying during the fall. All females ready to produce eggs gather in a specially prepared compound, which the males guard against all attacks. Tortle eggs are considered delicacies, so the location of the egg-laying grounds is always defensible. Tortles from all nations travel to these egg-laying grounds in the lands of the free tortles. Each female lays 4–24 eggs, which hatch about six months later. Some young fall prey to predators, but most survive to be raised by adults, usually under the tutelage of aunts and uncles. Tortle families are unusual, since parents do not live long enough to raise their children. Thus, a tortle family might consist of a small number of adult tortles and a number of their nieces and nephews of varying ages. The "family" is usually very close. Tortles never refer to fathers or mothers, except in reference to the Immortals, including Mother Ocean (Calitha, their protector)and Father Earth (Ka, the bringer of life). Within the last century, most tortles have added two more Immortals to their pantheon, both adopted from the lupins and considered the children of Mother Ocean and Father Earth: Brother Shell (Mâtin), the protector of families, and Sister Grain (Ralon), the patron of farmers and the bringer of food. Other than using the slash and burn farming method (which leaches nutrients from the soil), tortles generally live in harmony with nature. They are tolerant of most other intelligent people, as long as those beings treat tortles fairly.

Tortles have infravision with a range of 60 feet and can see underwater within this range as well. The creatures automatically gain the swimming skill, but they are clumsy swimmers. Their natural buoyancy keeps them afloat while they paddle along (even across bogs, quicksand, and mud). Tortles can hold their breath underwater for 10 turns.

Tortles do not wear armor; they have a natural AC of 3. They can retreat into their shells for protection. With some effort, they can bend and twist to pull their limbs and head into the shell, but they can take no other actions in the same round. When fully withdrawn, a tortle cannot move or attack but becomes AC 1 and gains a +4 bonus to all saving throws, even against mental attacks (because the tortle gains the benefit of its shell and marshals all its inner strength for defense). A withdrawn tortle can hear and smell but cannot see outside of its shell, making it immune to gaze attacks and other attacks that require a victim to see. Tortles receive +1 to Wisdom and Constitution, but -2 to Dexterity. Tortles may become fighters, thieves, mystics according to the normal rules for human character; they begin with -4,000 XP and 1 HD, gaining another HD until they reach level 0. They also receive a -20% penalty to all earned XP. Tortle fighters or thieves may also become wokani or shamans as per the rules in GAZ10. Tortle characters begin at an age of 20+2d4 years; Their maximum age is 50+2d100 years. Height is 62+3d6 inches; weight is 5,000+10d100 cn. Tortles may attack either with a weapon or a bite/claw/claw (1d6/1d4/1d4) routine.

 

Additional classes

Name

Source

Notes

Avenger

D&D Cyclopedia

Fighter subclass

Beastman

Hollow World Boxed Set

 

Brownie

PC1 Tall Tales of the Wee Folk

 

Brute-Man

Hollow World Boxed Set

 

Bugbear

GAZ10 The Orcs of Thar

 

Centaur

PC1 Tall Tales of the Wee Folk

 

Cleric

D&D Cyclopedia

 

Dervish

GAZ2 The Emirates of Ylaruam

NPC cleric variant

Druid

D&D Cyclopedia

Cleric subclass

Dryad

PC1 Tall Tales of the Wee Folk

 

Dwarf

D&D Cyclopedia

 

Dwarf-Cleric

GAZ6 The Dwarves of Rockhome

 

Elf

D&D Cyclopedia + GAZ5 The Elves of Alfheim

 

Elf, Aquatic

PC3 The SePeople

 

Elf, Schattenalfen

Hollow World Boxed Set

 

Elf, Shadow

GAZ13 The Shadow Elves

 

Elf, Shadow, Shaman

GAZ13 The Shadow Elves

 

Elf, Warrior

Hollow World Boxed Set

 

Faenare

PC2 Top Ballista

 

Faun

PC1 Tall Tales of the Wee Folk

 

Fighter

D&D Cyclopedia

 

Forester

Dawn of the Emperors Boxed Set

 

Giant, Sea

PC3 The Sea People

 

Gnoll

GAZ10 The Orcs of Thar

 

Gnome

PC2 Top Ballista

Gnome & Skygnome

Goblin

GAZ10 The Orcs of Thar

 

Gremlin

PC2 Top Ballista

 

Harpy

PC2 Top Ballista

 

Hin

D&D Cyclopedia + GAZ8 The Five Shires

AKA halfling

Hin Master

GAZ8 The Five Shires

Hin subclass

Hobgoblin

GAZ10 The Orcs of Thar

 

Hsiao

PC1 Tall Tales of the Wee Folk

 

Hutaakan

Hollow World Boxed Set

 

Immortal

Wrath of the Immortals Boxed Set

 

Kna

PC3 The Sea People

 

Knight

D&D Cyclopedia

Fighter subclass

Kobold

GAZ10 The Orcs of Thar

 

Kopru

PC3 The Sea People

 

Kubitt

Hollow World Boxed Set

 

Leprechaun

PC1 Tall Tales of the Wee Folk

 

Lizard Man, Malpheggi

HWorld Boxed Set

 

Lycanthrope, Devil Swine

PC4 Night Howlers

 

Lycanthrope, Werebat

PC4 Night Howlers

 

Lycanthrope, Werebear

PC4 Night Howlers

 

Lycanthrope, Wereboar

PC4 Night Howlers

 

Lycanthrope, Werefox

PC4 Night Howlers

 

Lycanthrope, Werejaguar

PC4 Night Howlers

 

Lycanthrope, Wererat

PC4 Night Howlers

Greater & Lesser

Lycanthrope, Wereseal

PC4 Night Howlers

XP table only for Lesser male

Lycanthrope, Wereshark

PC4 Night Howlers

 

Lycanthrope, Weretiger

PC4 Night Howlers

 

Lycanthrope, Werewolf

PC4 Night Howlers

 

Magic-User

D&D Cyclopedia

 

Merchant

GAZ11 The Republic of Darokin

Secondary class

Merrow

PC3 The Sea People

 

Mystic

D&D Cyclopedia

 

Nagpa

PC2 Top Ballista

 

Nixie

PC3 The Sea People

 

Ogre

GAZ10 The Orcof Thar

 

Orc

GAZ10 The Orcs of Thar

 

Orc, Krugel

Hollow World Boxed Set

 

Paladin

D&D Cyclopedia

Fighter subclass

Pegataur

PC2 Top Ballista

 

Pixie

PC1 Tall Tales of the Wee Folk

 

Pooka

PC1 Tall Tales of the Wee Folk

 

Rake

Dawn of the Emperors Boxed Set

 

Shaman

GAZ12 The Golden Kahn of Ethengar

Ethengar shaman

Shaman

GAZ14 The Atruaghin Clans

Atruaghin shaman

Shark-kin

PC3 The Sea People

 

Sidhe

PC1 Tall Tales of the Wee Folk

Fighter and Rogue

Sphinx

PC2 Top Ballista

 

Sprite

PC1 Tall Tales of the Wee Folk

 

Tabi

PC2 Top Ballista

 

Thief

D&D Cyclopedia

 

Treant

PC1 Tall Tales of the Wee Folk

 

Triton

PC3 The Sea People

 

Troll

GAZ10 The Orcs of Thar

 

Wise Woman

GAZ7 The Northern Reaches

NPC magic-user variant

Wood Imp

PC1 Tall Tales of the Wee Folk

 

Woodrake

PC1 Tall Tales of the Wee Folk

 

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